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Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy
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09/20/17 23:48
vcgeek 
09/20/17 23:48
vcgeek 
Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

I'm new so if I'm breaking any rules or if this has been discussed, I'm sorry. There was a pilot study discussed in this journal that appears to have had good results using two different orthotic devices. (A. Brauns et al. / Journal of Hand Therapy xxx (2016) 1e8) I have two questions:

Does anyone know if and where the two devices or similar (see attachments) can be purchased.

Has anyone actually tried anything similar to the trial's protocol. (20hrs/day, 3 months, limited pressure)

TIA
gary

Note: while editing I can see that there are two attachments. The preview doesn't show them. If they're not visible, I could use a little help

Attachment
A clinical trial of tension and compression orthoses for Dupuytren contractures - Journal of Hand Therapy 1.jpg A clinical trial of tension and compression orthoses for Dupuytren contractures - Journal of Hand Therapy 1.jpg (14x)

Mime-Type: image/jpeg, 162 kB

A clinical trial of tension and compression orthoses for Dupuytren contractures - Journal of Hand Therapy 2.jpg A clinical trial of tension and compression orthoses for Dupuytren contractures - Journal of Hand Therapy 2.jpg (9x)

Mime-Type: image/jpeg, 257 kB

09/21/17 07:56
wach 

Administrator

09/21/17 07:56
wach 

Administrator

Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

These splints look custom made, not a standard product.

Some results on pressure vs tension splinting for Dupuytren's:

Youtube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoktkyD8...eature=youtu.be

Journal:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28236563

09/22/17 05:48
vcgeek 
09/22/17 05:48
vcgeek 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

Yes that is the study I referenced. I would like to give either method a try. Compression seems to have advantages but would be harder to locate such a brace. I was hoping either could be bought.

Maybe I'm missing something. Why is there no interest in this?

g

09/22/17 19:57
kbr 
09/22/17 19:57
kbr 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

Hi vcgeek. Thanks for your posts. I think we're all interested in any info about treatments, especially noninvasive treatments. Don't forget that a lot of us read, but some are a little shy about posting. There have been discussions about splinting, with or without surgery. I don't have much of a contracture issue now--maybe I never will. I use a biking glove and a Popsicle stick at night. Others do similar homemade glove treatments. Some use the Fixx glove or other professionally made gloves/splints. I think the study you mentioned confirms that we're doing the right thing. The compression idea sounds good. Maybe an OT could help with that? Might take some phone calls to find someone who knows about it, or would be willing to learn about it for you. I found some silicone stuff online where you mix two things together to make kind of a putty, which you can mold to your hand/finger. Can't remember what it's called. But maybe that could be used in a homemade compression glove/splint, if you go that route.

I'm assuming you have contractures, and are trying to figure out what to do. Good luck, and keep us posted about anything you learn.

Edited 09/25/17 05:40

09/24/17 16:27
BRIANB 
09/24/17 16:27
BRIANB 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

I know I am repeating myself ...
long story short ...been wearing custom made hand splints...replace each year..made by CHT.. since 2009
wear each night while sleeping...so far with great results !!!Started wearing after NA by Dr, Eaton ...
i

09/25/17 05:15
vcgeek 
09/25/17 05:15
vcgeek 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

Thanks BrianB.

It might be a repeat to others, but it's new to me. I didn't know there was such a thing as a CHT.

Now if I can find one that will design a brace for me, I'll repeat the study. n=1

g

09/26/17 02:04
BRIANB 
09/26/17 02:04
BRIANB 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

The Certified Hand Therapist made the braces ..Dr. Eaton provided the script... although the braces are updated every year..my ins. pays for them ... the braces are formed to my hand...providing support to the palm..because the palm wants to curl up as you sleep. The braces extend to keep the affected fingers straight... velcro keeps the entire brace secured...then what I have added for comfort... I wear very light weight cotton white cloves underneath...I believe they are cooler gloves ...

Also ... I wear gloves while driving long distances ...avoid pulling on hands..such as pull ups etc....and avoid vibration...

So far so good ...just a very slight cord in thumb area ...So I had the brace include the thumb also as a precautionary measure..
Sorry for the long post ...but if it helps one person ..it's worth it ..

10/11/17 16:38
Steelhead 
10/11/17 16:38
Steelhead 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

BRIANB:
The Certified Hand Therapist made the braces ..Dr. Eaton provided the script... although the braces are updated every year..my ins. pays for them ... the braces are formed to my hand...providing support to the palm..because the palm wants to curl up as you sleep. The braces extend to keep the affected fingers straight... velcro keeps the entire brace secured...then what I have added for comfort... I wear very light weight cotton white cloves underneath...I believe they are cooler gloves ...

Also ... I wear gloves while driving long distances ...avoid pulling on hands..such as pull ups etc....and avoid vibration...

So far so good ...just a very slight cord in thumb area ...So I had the brace include the thumb also as a precautionary measure..
Sorry for the long post ...but if it helps one person ..it's worth it ..

Just to add a couple thoughts....

Assuming your CHT uses the standard splinting material (usually white or beige with all the little holes in it) be advised a good hair dryer on high heat can be used to modify points of discomfort, change the shape, modify the degree of hand / finger stretch, etc. Often the CHT uses a warm water bath to soak (heat) the entire splint and starts over (ala new splint you have to pay for each time)...but if you just want to make small adjustments at home for comfort or to increase/decrease how it fits your hand or fingers, try the hair dryer on high heat where you wish to make changes. I made a brand new splint with a hair dryer at home using an old splint I had just laying around. Works just as good, I would say better because I can make micro adjustments whenever I want.

I also bought my own roll (comes in a box of a lot of feet per roll) of the white/beige tube sock material the CHT normally provides for comfort and sweat management. I just pull off a long piece to cover my hand and forearm where the splint will contact the skin, cut a TINY slit for my thumb (since it stretches so much) and can replace as needed...versus wearing a full glove. I call these "My Socky things" since it is a very lightweight tube sock concept for the hand and forearm.

Another trick is to get a box of "Surgical Pads" from Walgreens. Normally used for blood or fluid management management (sort of like a trauma dressing), they work GREAT as replaceable padding in my splint, absorb sweat, and makes my splint easier to wear for longer vs. the hard splint material. The version I found at Walgreens fits perfectly in the hand/forearm area almost like it was custom made for this use.

Edited 10/11/17 16:44

10/11/17 22:44
BRIANB 
10/11/17 22:44
BRIANB 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

all good advice ...tks .... rotten disease ...
I have worn my spints for so many years my wife wears a football helmet to bed at night because she is sick of getting whacked in the head ... just kidding

10/12/17 20:32
vcgeek 
10/12/17 20:32
vcgeek 
Re: Pilot Study appearing in Journal of Hand Therapy

I appreciate the comments on application/mechanics, and I've noticed a hint of longevity. In a round about way that is an endorsement.

More directly, is it effective and how so? Has it improved extension or is more a delay tactic?

TIA
g

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