| Lost password
33 users onlineYou are not loggend in.  Login
experiences with dupuytren
 1
 1
04/13/19 13:48
ron_sd_cal 
04/13/19 13:48
ron_sd_cal 
experiences with dupuytren

I can share my thoughts on my personal experiences (depending on level of interest from forum responses). Most recently, I was climbing down from a structure/stage. My dupuytren affected finger got caught in a light support (given it's contracted angle) and with all of my weight snapped the dupuytren cord and the accident corrected (opened) my hand significantly restoring functionality. I have not yet discussed this with my doctor but found the experience interesting/bewildering. I wanted to share this experience with the community.

04/13/19 16:48
wach 

Administrator

04/13/19 16:48
wach 

Administrator

Re: experiences with dupuytren

Hi Ron,

what you are describing happens occasionally and is completely "normal". It's basically the same as when doctors perform needle aponeurotomy: they damage the cord with a needle and then break it by pulling on it https://www.dupuytren-online.info/needle_aponeurotomy.html . You broke the cord without the needling. The result is pretty much the same. You might now consider wearing a splint for a while to keep your finger straight and avoid quick recurrence https://www.dupuytren-online.info/dupuyt...-splinting.html .

Well done anyway!

Wolfgang

04/13/19 19:26
ron_sd_cal 
04/13/19 19:26
ron_sd_cal 
Re: experiences with dupuytren

I found in my case that most of the constricting of the hand happens when the hand is idle and closed for long periods of time. As such, I was able to prolong the results by learning how to sleep on my hands to keep them flattened during sleep. I didn't find splinting practical in my case especially when traveling.

I have heard people discussing of surgeries and their doctor has not mentioned also having a skin graph to replace the outer layer of the skin on the hand. My doctor explained to me that if the outer skin (where the disease is located) is not replaced that the condition is likely to return after surgery. If your doctor hasn't mentioned this you might want to get a second opinion by another professional and do more research on the subject.

04/14/19 15:41
wach 

Administrator

04/14/19 15:41
wach 

Administrator

Re: experiences with dupuytren

Isn't it difficult to control what your hand is doing while you are sleeping? Personally I found the Fixxglove quite convenient to wear and it does exactly what you are aiming at: it heeps the fingers straight at night.

Wolfgang

04/14/19 16:42
Stefan_K. 
04/14/19 16:42
Stefan_K. 

Re: experiences with dupuytren

Hi Ron, I was wondering about the same thing. I sometimes try and manage to sleep on my right hand, but I am of the majority of people who turn unconsciously at night, so as confirmed by time-lapse recording with my action cam (for sleep apnea surveillance) that position is never held very long in spite of my best efforts to stay on the side rather than sleep on my back. Do you wake up in the position you fell asleep in?

Stef

[56, Dupuytren diagnosis 2006, RH contracture and PNF/NA 2014, radiotherapy RH 2015, LH 2017 & 2018, night splint glove RH since 2015]

 1
 1
unconsciously   occasionally   surveillance   experiences   dupuytren-online   contracture   interesting   professional   contracted   functionality   aponeurotomy   constricting   experience   convenient   bewildering   significantly   dupuytren   time-lapse   completely   radiotherapy