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Finger Splint
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08/08/15 18:55
Broderbund 
08/08/15 18:55
Broderbund 
Finger Splint

Hi

I've got an appt with a DD experienced surgeon in 3 weeks hoping to have NA done. Nodule on my left pinky pip joint ...around 20 degree contracted.

Should I consider splinting the finger at night ? Will that slow down the rate of contracture and potentially keep the finger straighter?

Appreciate any thoughts .....

08/08/15 20:04
mikes 
08/08/15 20:04
mikes 
Re: Finger Splint

Yes. Definitely.

08/08/15 22:19
BRIANB 
08/08/15 22:19
BRIANB 
Re: Finger Splint

imo yes ..the palm should be supported also ...been wearing splints for years ..they help me

08/10/15 20:26
Cherise 
08/10/15 20:26
Cherise 

Re: Finger Splint

Broderbund:
Hi

I've got an appt with a DD experienced surgeon in 3 weeks hoping to have NA done. Nodule on my left pinky pip joint ...around 20 degree contracted.

Should I consider splinting the finger at night ? Will that slow down the rate of contracture and potentially keep the finger straighter?

Appreciate any thoughts .....

Once DD becomes active my Dr. told me I will be wearing night splints for years to prevent the relaxed fingers while sleeping from curling all night. My night splint does include the Palm. The spring splint allows use of the fingers for day support and use of the hand.

Kind Regards
Cherise

Edited 08/10/15 20:29

09/12/15 13:36
tomceunen 
09/12/15 13:36
tomceunen 
Re: Finger Splint

http://www.dupuytrensche-kontraktur.de/i...ve.htm#englisch

Looks like a very good solution, in fact I made a copy for both hands and so far so good.
Waking up the fingers are straight.
Just wondering if this will be a lifetime solution or if I will need surgery one day?

Edited 09/12/15 13:36

09/12/15 13:45
wach 

Administrator

09/12/15 13:45
wach 

Administrator

Re: Finger Splint

Probably not. Long term splinting typically stiffens the finger Joints. Surgery can be postponed by

radiotherapy http://www.dupuytren-online.info/radiation_therapy.html

or you can first have

Needle Aponeurotomy (NA) http://www.dupuytren-online.info/needle_aponeurotomy.html or

collagenase injections http://www.dupuytren-online.info/dupuytren_collagenase.html

and surgery as last resort.

Wolfgang

tomceunen:
Looks like a very good solution, in fact I made a copy for both hands and so far so good.
Waking up the fingers are straight.
Just wondering if this will be a lifetime solution or if I will need surgery one day?

09/12/15 23:55
Cherise 
09/12/15 23:55
Cherise 

Re: Finger Splint

Wach is absolutely right. I Learned the hard way & trusted a hand surgeon with little DC experience. Surgery can & does make DC begin a gruesome active stage that will not stop...we'll eventually once a doc experienced in DC has treated the issue. That was my personal experience before I found this FORUM.

See a doc who specializes in NA , RT, OR XIAFLEX..These options are all good depending on the stage the DC is at that will also determine which treatment is best.

A splint worn every night for the ever was my Dr. advice. Why? As we sleep our fingers naturally roll into the fist position encouraging contraction of the fingers into a fist at rest.

My wrist has also taken a toll from this disease it's in a cast as the tendon has torn from compenstong for DC in the hand.

Read all you can on this forum. It's the best place for all the info you need on the Internet. This is for many a very painful disease. Messaging the nodes lightly in my palms has lessoned their size & pain level.
Take care & hang in there.


Kind Regards
Cherise

09/14/15 03:08
Rocky 
09/14/15 03:08
Rocky 
Re: Finger Splint

Sorry.....let me get this straight please.

I have nodules and cords on my left hand and cords only on my right. No contracture at all.

Am I to assume that it will be FINE to splint my left hand at night without causing undue or further damage?

If so, I would prefer to use a tongue depressor and wrap it with something.

Does this sound like 'good treatment' for me at this stage?

09/14/15 09:01
wach 

Administrator

09/14/15 09:01
wach 

Administrator

Re: Finger Splint

Hi Rocky,

as I wrote above "Long term splinting typically stiffens the finger joints."

Consistent nightly splinting might and probably will avoid contracture but

1. on a long term (years of splinting) it will probably stiffen your joints which will make it more difficult using your hand

2. it will help only as long as you are wearing the splint. When you stop wearing it the contracture might come, even after years of wearing a splint.

Does it sound like a good treatment at this stage? Maybe, maybe not. It's more a personaly decision and I myself wouldn't do it.

Wolfgang

Rocky:
Sorry.....let me get this straight please.

I have nodules and cords on my left hand and cords only on my right. No contracture at all.

Am I to assume that it will be FINE to splint my left hand at night without causing undue or further damage?

If so, I would prefer to use a tongue depressor and wrap it with something.

Does this sound like 'good treatment' for me at this stage?

09/14/15 09:05
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

09/14/15 09:05
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: Finger Splint

Rocky:
Sorry.....let me get this straight please.

I have nodules and cords on my left hand and cords only on my right. No contracture at all.

Am I to assume that it will be FINE to splint my left hand at night without causing undue or further damage?

If so, I would prefer to use a tongue depressor and wrap it with something.

Does this sound like 'good treatment' for me at this stage?
There's no evidence to support the use of splinting to prevent contracture, before surgery (or NA or Xiaflex). Do it if it makes you feel good, but the finger joints will likely and briefly feel stiff in the mornings. I have to ask on what basis you have decided to do this?

The evidence for the success of splinting after interventions is neutral, but there are lots of stories of folks whose contracture restarted when they stopped splinting. Since there is no evidence against either, most doctors recommend a period of splinting after the intervention.

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