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The right words to ask a prospective hand surgeon
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04/15/21 02:17
BobL 
04/15/21 02:17
BobL 
Re: The right words to ask a prospective hand surgeon

Prof.Seegenschmiedt:
Dear BobL

spanishbuddha made a very good point: this world is NOT CHEAP !... and any advice which might be cheap is probably deceiving you or others - CHEAP ADVERTISING governs many aspects of our life and unfortunatey even MEDICINE !

You have to throw your HEART, SOUL and BODY into someone's ARMS. THOUGHTS and BRAIN to get the right approach to yourself and your specific problem. Your FUTURE TREATMENT does not only require the APPROPRIATE OPTIMAL TECHNIQUE (which may be even performed by an anonymous machine" but even more so on AN INDIVUAL WELL TRAINED & EXPERIENCED PHYSICIAN as a RELITABLE PERSONALITY WHOM YOU CAN TRUST .... livelong, as your two hands and eventuall your feet are to precious to be thrown under a cheap knife, a cheap injection or undefined X-rays.

And beyond the search of an appropriate WORDING and receipt of good COUNSELLING an optimal medicine also requires a GOOD BLESSING for the practicing doctor and the patient - a gift which cannot be bought in this WORLD

My current conclusion from this THREAD for you:

Hopefully you will find the best way to approach your aleady complicated pathway burdened by doubts and hesitation.
Maybe you will now read my advice "TO TREAT or NOT TO TREAT - THAT IS THE QUESTION" in the Practice Guidebook

Yours sincerely. Prof. Dr. med. M. Heinrich Seegenschmiedt

Prof.Seegenschmiedt:
BobL:
I am actively looking for a doctor to help me with my Dupuytren's contracture. I have called several doctor's offices up, some nearby and others farther away. While I know what I want, I am having trouble figuring out what questions to ask, or even if it is inappropriate to ask such questions. .......

Thanks,

BobL

Good Day for You, BobL

In case your fingers have not yet shown any contracture ( e.g. maximal contracture 10 degree) the use of radiotherapy is still another good option to treat; thus, also an experienced radiation oncologist or therapist may provide a solution for you ...

And if only ONE FINGER has a significant contracture (above 45 degree) , but the other fingers NO CONTRACTURE the solution might be a COMBINED APPROACH, namely minimal invasive RELEASE of the finger plus prophylactic radiotherapy for this finger plus whole hand palm with onl ONE RT SERIES.

So, overall, do not forget to consider RADIOTHERAPY as a treatment option; and if you like you may ask me via E-mail and eventually receive a special medical video consultation with full disease assessment of all your four extremities and broad discussion of the available treatment options from me :prof.seegenschmiedt@gmail.com

Wish you all the best with your (unknown) disease condition and right choices and finally success,
Prof. Dr. med. M. Heinrich Seegenschmiedt

With gratitude for all affected patients & medical colleagues who help to advance patient care ...


Dear Prof. Dr. med. M. Heinrich Seegenschmiedt,

Thank you, again, for your kind words and advice.

Any transaction - whether health-related or otherwise - requires a certain level of TRUST. And (to paraphrase Stephen Covey) for someone to be worthy of TRUST requires a combination of CHARACTER and COMPETENCE. I will give any working professional the initial assumption of sufficient CHARACTER, but COMPETENCE is another thing altogether.

I spent many years as a computer networking consultant and felt it perfectly reasonable for a prospective client to ask from me evidence of my experience and ability to perform in the role for which they were considering me. And yet, when I talk with the staff of certain medical professionals (because, here in the US, we cannot talk with the actual doctor without paying for that opportunity), they seem almost offended that I would ask about qualifications and experience.

It seems that - at least here in the US - if medical doctors did IT consulting, if you were to ask them for their qualifications with XYZ technology, they would likely respond with: "Well, I cannot be certain that XYZ technology is the right solution for your needs." ;-)

(I hope that you can see the humor in the above - and, especially, that it does not offend you.)

Best regards,

BobL

05/05/21 23:51
rockinroller 
05/05/21 23:51
rockinroller 
Re: The right words to ask a prospective hand surgeon

For U.S. patients with Dupuytrens who aren't looking for surgery, I'd recommend going to the Xiaflex website (just google the word). There's links to view a list of physicians based on your zip code who are registered users of that protocol in treating the disease (I believe they're listed in order the most to least frequent treaters). That helped me identify who--at least--was experienced in the treatment of DD, period. And I found through further investigation that every doctor I contacted or saw did not limit their treatment practices to Xiaflex. But it seemed that those who were on the Xiaflex site as registered users had more options to consider other than going straight to the knife.

Edited 05/05/21 23:51

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