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Yoga and Dupuytrens
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05/03/12 20:16
reganmutherford 
05/03/12 20:16
reganmutherford 
Yoga and Dupuytrens

My Dupuytren's recently took a turn for the worse. I am an avid yoga practitioner but find downward dog and handstands and other poses that require a flattened palm nigh impossible and pretty painful. Does anyone have suggestions for modifications?

05/03/12 21:00
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

05/03/12 21:00
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

I don't do yoga so apologies in advance if this is off base: I wonder if 'push up grips' can be used and would help?

As a fellow DD patient I now avoid as much as possible loading on my hands, so for example I cycle with ergonomic grips and play tennis with a glove.

05/03/12 21:24
reganmutherford 
05/03/12 21:24
reganmutherford 
Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

Thank you, Spanish Buddha. I'll try your suggestion.

05/03/12 21:56
flojo 
05/03/12 21:56
flojo 
Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

Downward dog pose was the first Dupuytren's symptom I noticed because putting my hand flat with pressure on it hurt my thumb. I didn't even know about DD at the time, so I self-diagnosed it as arthritis. I still don't have arthritis in my thumb. it's DD.

I recently slightly sprained my foot transitioning from one pose to another doing Sun Salutations. A week or so afterwards I noticed small bumps in the arch of my foot and am wondering if that is beginning Ledderhose's and possibly related to the sprain. I'm just watching and trying not to injure my foot again.

Just sharing my experience and don't really know what it means for me, much less what it may mean for someone else. Just keep noticing little things and tuck them away in your mind. It may be important information later.,

02/14/22 15:28
Lanikai75 
02/14/22 15:28
Lanikai75 

Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

I see this thread has been inactive for a while so am hoping perhaps there might be new studies on this topic. I have been doing yoga for many years and was recently diagnosed with DD. Yoga is particularly beneficial for osteoporosis which I also suffer from. I assume we still do not know if it is beneficial or not, but theoretically the mind - body connection would be helpful. Do we have any data to indicate if yoga might aggravate DD? Should one carry on with positions such as down dog or plank, or avoid anything that requires palm flat to the floor?

Edited 02/14/22 15:29

02/14/22 15:45
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

02/14/22 15:45
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

Lanikai75:
I see this thread has been inactive for a while so am hoping perhaps there might be new studies on this topic. I have been doing yoga for many years and was recently diagnosed with DD. Yoga is particularly beneficial for osteoporosis which I also suffer from. I assume we still do not know if it is beneficial or not, but theoretically the mind - body connection would be helpful. Do we have any data to indicate if yoga might aggravate DD? Should one carry on with positions such as down dog or plank, or avoid anything that requires palm flat to the floor?
Most discussions I have seen revolve around how to continue doing those yoga positions that require the palm flat, by using alternative options such as foam, grips, fists, forearms, blocks, or slight modifications to the position that avoid painful stretches of the hand. I don't do yoga but avoid hand stretches when the hands/fingers are cold, and avoid anything that provokes pain.

02/14/22 16:22
Lanikai75 
02/14/22 16:22
Lanikai75 

Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

Sounds like good advice, thanks. Do you think it necessary to use a padded glove to protect the affected hand?

02/15/22 09:40
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

02/15/22 09:40
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: Yoga and Dupuytrens

Lanikai75:
Sounds like good advice, thanks. Do you think it necessary to use a padded glove to protect the affected hand?
I wear a glove when doing DIY, playing tennis, handling tools. I don't know what gripping or handling is done in yoga that might suggest a glove helps. After doing the move, or activity, look at your hand; any marks, blanching, or pressure point indentations left behind might suggest you would have benefited from some protection.

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