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Massage therapy
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05/30/07 22:51
Annmarie

not registered

Massage therapy

Has anyone tried intense hand massage as a treatment? I don't actually have this condition, but my boyfriends mother has just been diagnosed.
Im training to be a sports massage therapist so my area of study is soft tissue manpulation and I cant see any logical reason why this woudnt work! Proper use of massage and deep friction can break down nodules, adhesions and even fibrosis in muscles!
Id love to work on my boyfriends mum but she lives too far away so if anyone else has had good results working with a qualified deep tissue massage therapist Id be interested to know! Or maybe someone would consider trying it? Seems to me a lot less extreme than radiation or surgery!
Annmarie (Ireland)

05/31/07 03:03
Mark_D 
Re: Massage therapy

Annmarie:

Sorry, but I haven't read anything about massage therapy for Dups.

If massage helps, I'd sure like to know about it.

Mark

05/31/07 07:58
wach 

Administrator

Re: Massage therapy

From a German hand surgeon I have heard of a patient who refused surgery and instead daily and excessively massaged his cord with a wooden ball. The surgeon was quite surprised that the cord was considerably smaller and softer when the patient showed up again. I also think I remember someone who used a plastic massaging ball with some success.

I you search the forum (including answers) for "herbal oil" you will find a post from casuzen who reports relief from massaging. Unfortunately there is no later post that confirms the improvement.

Anyway, I you are experienced with massaging fibroses why not give it a try? Let us know the outcome!

Wolfgang

05/31/07 20:40
Annmarie

not registered

Re: Massage therapy

Well if there is anyone around the Dublin area who would like to give massage a bash leave a comment and maybe we can arrange something?? I would really love to try it and see how it goes.

06/29/07 20:26
ActiveCouple 
Re: Massage therapy

Quote:



Well if there is anyone around the Dublin area who would like to give massage a bash leave a comment and maybe we can arrange something?? I would really love to try it and see how it goes.


Hi,
I just read your communication, and that sounds reasonable. Has anyone contacted you about this since May? Unfortunately I live in the States, but I think I am going to try this myself here.

07/03/07 04:55
Roselle 
Re: Massage therapy

I am a Licensed Massage Therapist and have tried some massage on my own hand, with no success. However, I must also say that the initial 'expert' opinion I got from my hand surgeon, to wit: "There is NOTHING that can alleviate Dupuytren's except surgery" (1992) discouraged me from regular self treatment (or other treatment). Even today, in 2007, and after NA is already being used successfully in several States, the long list of Arizona hand surgeons I called to inquire about NA yielded not a single doctor in Arizona who is even willing to LOOK at alternative resources. I have renewed hope from the publications of the Dupuytren Society, Drs Eaton and others, that the hopelessness of my and others' condition is NOT so. I, too, would appreciate any information about even slight success with massage therapy, along with detailed description of how, how often, and how long massage was administered before showing results.

07/03/07 23:55
markb51

not registered

Re: Massage therapy



I have posted here before. I have been getting accupuncture with electro-stim at least twice a week. I know for a fact that it has reduced the size and texture of the Ledderhose condition (both feet have been attacked) and I have also been using this on my Dup in the palm of my right hand. It appears to be beneficial for the hand, but I know it has helped with reduction of the size, less pain, and the softening of the lumps in my feet.

I do get pretty intense accupressure massages on my feet weekly and while they are sometimes painful, they do provide additional symptom relief.

MarkB

11/10/11 18:44
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

I realize this post is quite old, but I wanted to let you know I have so far treated 2 clients with early onset ( 1 client with a cord and 1 v small nodule the other with a cord and 2 pea sized nodules causing a 20 degree bend) who have both responded well to cross fiber frictions and slow controlled compression techniques.

Unfortunately I cannot find research evidence to support massage therapys use, but i have talked to a small number of therapists in the USA and Canada who have also had favourable outcomes.

Stephen Jeffrey West London UK

Edited 10/29/12 18:15

01/18/13 14:27
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

stephenjeffrey:
I realize this post is quite old, but I wanted to let you know I have so far treated 2 clients with early onset ( 1 client with a cord and 1 v small nodule the other with a cord and 2 pea sized nodules causing a 20 degree bend) who have both responded well to cross fiber frictions and slow controlled compression techniques.

Unfortunately I cannot find research evidence to support massage therapys use, but i have talked to a small number of therapists in the USA and Canada who have also had favourable outcomes.

Stephen Jeffrey West London UK

Just to update you on the 2 above clients progress.

Both clients have maintained their improved condition and I am pleased to report no new nodules, no new contractures. :)

Both clients continue to come once per month for other issues that build up as part of their jobs. I dedicate 20 mins of each session to checking their palms and fingers for any warning signs and release any tension with the techniques mentioned above. The only time I became concerned was when 1 client returned from 2 weeks golfing in Ireland, the cord that been inactive had tightened up and was trying to start contracting. However by the next session it had softened and stopped pulling.


A new client.
From nov 2012 I have been treating a client with a 70 degree contracture of the PIP joint of the little finger of the right hand. This was a case of rapid onset ( 6 degrees per month ) during the preceding 12 mths. The palmer fascia proximal to and over the MCP joint was thickened and tight. The involved PIP joint was red and sore (possibly from attempts at too much stretching).
The good news is the contracture has stopped increasing, the palmer fascia has normalised and is soft, the PIP joint is no longer red or sore.
However, because the original angle of contracture has not yet reversed it is still 70 degrees, we are starting a day taping and night splinting program. (My client may be clenching fists during sleep.)
I will let you know of any progress in due course.

Regards Stephen Jeffrey

01/21/13 22:15
newmarcy 
Re: Massage therapy

Wow, that is very encouraging, thanks so much for that. I have a case, which doesn't bother me much at all except if I press on it too much, there must be a nerve underneath, and my pinky and finger beside will become numb for a couple of days, as though I've pinched a nerve, but it always comes back to normal. Not painful, just annoying. I will let my massage therapist know.

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