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Massage therapy
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03/30/15 06:09
Sherise 
03/30/15 06:09
Sherise 
Re: Massage therapy

I am a skeptic. DC is the thickening of cords/ tendons in palm and fingers. It's collagen that thickens the cords and forms the nodules. It a auto immune disease a form of arthritis. How massage therapy could possibly eliminate this unless it is in the very early stages only.

I am in stage 4. Tried message years ago, NA, Surgery and XIAFLEX . I am in the 4th stage of DC Not much is working I am sad to that report in my case.

I hope in your case it helps, and keeping a splint on it at night if a finger is contracting will help.

Good Luck

09/07/15 18:04
dpjcrfsh 
09/07/15 18:04
dpjcrfsh 
Re: Massage therapy

I have been trying self massage for the last week and a half of so. Just a few observations. I'm at stage N (no contracture, but have four definite nodes and a couple places that look like they will be and have the start of a couple cords. I try gentle circular massage of the nodes, followed by strong compression for 60-90 seconds. I also do compression on the cords and try to do cross frictional movements. But I'm not trained in massage. This is just what I've gleaned from this forum and elsewhere. Prior to massage, my hands had low level pain, maybe a 2 on a pain scale from 1-10. After starting the massage the levels of pain have dropped considerably. Often my hands feel really good. But the affects seem to wear off to some extent after a day. My hardest node has softened from about tennis ball hardness (grade 3) to tomato (grade 1) or even softer. Right after massage, all not nodes have the softness of a rotten tomato, but they tend to harden back up to some degree fairly quickly, but it might take a day to get back to where they were, but again the originally hardest node seems never as hard as it was. In general my hands feel better and I don't feel I have to be as careful about touching the nodes, like with scissors, etc. The way massage makes my hands feel is the same as if I do a lot of work with my hands. I've noticed before after a full day of working with the hands, they feel great for a day or two. After massaging one day, I had some sharp pains in tissue adjacent to the nodes that was worrying, but that went away after a day. Perhaps I was too aggressive. It's hard to say if what I'm doing it positive or negative, but I feel it's a positive. The disease progression is so gradually and unpredictable, that it's hard to measure the effects very well.

09/28/15 01:50
CACoder 
09/28/15 01:50
CACoder 

Re: Massage therapy

Well I'm convinced it's worth a shot. It seems the trouble is finding a massage therapist in my area. Any recommendations on what to look for in a good massage therapist to treat my Dup's? I don't think there are any that specialize in the condition, so a willingness to learn is probably a must. Maybe I'll order myself a copy of those two books mentioned earlier in this thread (Rattray's clinical massage therapy and Tidy's massage therapy and remedial exercises) for the therapist to borrow. Are there any other good resources I should direct them to?

10/15/15 23:45
stephenjeffrey 
10/15/15 23:45
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

CACoder:
Well I'm convinced it's worth a shot. It seems the trouble is finding a massage therapist in my area. Any recommendations on what to look for in a good massage therapist to treat my Dup's? I don't think there are any that specialize in the condition, so a willingness to learn is probably a must. Maybe I'll order myself a copy of those two books mentioned earlier in this thread (Rattray's clinical massage therapy and Tidy's massage therapy and remedial exercises) for the therapist to borrow. Are there any other good resources I should direct them to?

Hi C A and others
if you send me a private email with your location I will try to find you a suitable massage therapist/s in your area and forward you the massage protocol I use.

I would not advise you get those books I described in a previous post as one is out of print and the other is very expensive.

Regards Stephen Jeffrey

Edited 10/15/15 23:47

02/22/17 15:17
stephenjeffrey 
02/22/17 15:17
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

An overview of my experience's and recent client outcomes for 2016 using massage therapy.

During 2016 I had a further 6 early stage Dupuytrens clients (nodules only, or nodules and cords with only minor contraction less than 10 degrees)
All responded well to treatment (stop progression) except for 1 client who had pain from very hard nodules who then elected for surgery, but I do not know his outcome.
Particularly pleasing was a 29 yr old (his father had Dups surgeries) who had one very hard nodule one smaller softer nodule and the start of a small cord. He has responded very well, cord and small nodule have regressed and larger harder nodule is much softer. These results were achieved even though he continued his sport of Jiu Jitsu !

I contacted 3 clients for follow up, 5 months,18 months and 3 years, none has seen any progression, and none were having further massage treatment.

I attended a British Dupuytrens society meeting in Harley street at the end of 2016, it was particularly encouraging to find these consultants were engaged in understanding more about their Dupuytrens/ledderhose/peyronie's disease patients and the work of the BDS. I hope to persuade a consultant/s to use massage therapy pre as well as post Dups surgery to see if we can reduce re occurrence rates.

My own studies continue in neuroscience, mechanobiology and biomaterial science in an effort to inform myself and my fellow professionals of the unique and highly complex human beings with which we are privileged to work.

02/22/17 17:43
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

02/22/17 17:43
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: Massage therapy

Thanks for sharing Stephen. So encouraging. It would be interesting to know a bit more about the massage, even though I know you will share the protocol with a fellow professional.

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