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Do children inherit Dupuytren's??
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05/31/05 02:36
Patty

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05/31/05 02:36
Patty

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Family/Genes

Let's face it... the ole Vikings got Around Alot. They were everywhere !!!! Someone can say they were from Spain, and that would be somewhere where they went. They have been tracked to Minnesota. I am Scott, and am in the like background, but, Anyone can have the genes, as they were all Over this world. Does not matter what nationality you are. The genes can be there.
Patty

07/18/05 02:04
Jen

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07/18/05 02:04
Jen

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Michael. mild- not!

this disease may be seem mild to you but my 66 year old mother has it and it is not mild to her, both her hands have it, affecting three fingers on one, with her little finger and the next pulled down to her palm on both hands. She had one hand operated on in 1999 but was a complete waist of time as her knuckles where already set in place. she gets very frustrated as her fingers get in the way all the time. Ever tried putting on gloves with your fingers pulled down, basically imposible.
Yes at least it not life threatening, but still not to be laughed at.

08/16/05 02:15
Wolfgang Wach

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08/16/05 02:15
Wolfgang Wach

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Dupuytren statistics

Below is a fairly recent summary, taken from a research papaer, of where Dupuytren's disease comes from and what other diseases might influence it:

"Dupuytren's disease is the "classical" hand illness of the North: it affects people of Celtic or Viking descent throughout the whole of Northern Europe, whereas it is an unknown disease in the Mediterranean region. Dupuytren's contracture appears to be an extremity-related disease. ... . 566 patients suffering from Dupuytren's disease in the area around Hanover were analyzed with respect to epidemiological features and their Tubiana contracture stage. 91.2% were of pure northern German stock, 12.5% had a family predisposition. The male-to-female ratio was 7:1. Men were afflicted on average at the age of 56 years. Intellectuals were scored 3.17, while manual workers scored 4.21. ... 55.1% had bilateral contracture. Ectopic penile and plantar fibrosis or knuckle pads were found in 6.7% of cases. The distribution of stages I-IV decreased by 2.4% from 59.1% among the 1,808 afflicted finger rays. With a score of 3.7-3.72, drinkers and smokers presented significantly more severe contractures, while the 8.2% of diabetics displayed a milder form. Among the epileptics - all of whom were affected bilaterally - the Tubiana stage of 3.71 exceeded the median manual score of 3.63 for the group as a whole. ... Women develop the disease one decade later than men. In old age the male-to-female ratio equalizes. Drinkers, smokers and heavy manual workers present a more severe affliction, while diabetics suffer from a significantly less severe form. ... . 1.9 million Germans are chronically ill because of Dupuytren's disease."

Source: P. Brenner, A. Krause-Bergmann, V. Ha Van, Dupuytren's disease in the Northern part of Germany - Epidemiological features of more than 500 cases, Der Unfallchirurg - Organ der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Unfallchirugie, Vol. 104/4 (2001) p 303-311.

08/16/05 02:56
SteveX

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08/16/05 02:56
SteveX

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Viking genes?

Hi this is my first post, i wouldnt even be here if it wasn't for the fact that my DC has appeared again (last monday) I had surgery on my right hand 20 years ago, which i would prefer not to go through again. I think it was triggered by stress on my fingers trying to climb a fence, slipping and left dangling by my hands on a T-shaped pole. 3days later both my hands have swelled up and i am in a lot of pain. DC is now affecting my little finger on right, ring finger on my left although it is slightly less overt.
Both my parents suffered from DC, my Father who is now deceased, never had his hands treated, they were both badly deformed. He was born in England but his father was Scottish. He died before i was born so I dont know if he had DC.
My Mother is now 76 and she has just recently had surgery on one hand having lived with it for as long as i can remember. Its quite interesting to hear about NA now, a few years back i recall my Mother picking at her fingers with a sewing needle. She didnt realise it at the time but she was on the right track! (i wouldn't recommend this) Her Grandfather was also Scottish, I dont know if he had DC, his death was due to Diabetes according to his Death Cert.
Both my parents were heavy drinkers but my Mother has stopped drinking now. I am aheavy drinker and also smoke, my Father was also a smoker.
Now i have been thinking about this Viking theory, could it have appeared as an early form of RSI? Rowing possibly for days on end must have put a lot of strain on the oarsmens hands.
I am 55 now but when i was a young boy i would help the Milkman every weekend, carrying a dozen bottles in a thin handled crate. Then would knock hundreds of doors every week with the same righthand finger (the one first affected by DC) this went on for 3 years or so until i was old enough to become a newspaper boy.
My Father worked on the Tugs, for years he was a Milkman and a merchant seaman before that. My Mother spent many years working on assembly line in an electronics factory (she thinks this has affected her hands).
Well for me, its been 7 days of severe pain so far but today the pain seems to be becoming more tolerable. Have been using Tiger Balm.
Best wishes to all, this forum has been very helpful for me. Will definately consider NA treatment.

Best wishes SteveX

08/23/05 02:48
Wolfgang Wach

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08/23/05 02:48
Wolfgang Wach

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manual labour and Dupuytren

Hi Steve,

there is some indication that hard manual labour fosters growth of Dupuytren nodules, also that an accident or surgery of the hand can trigger them. Yet it seems that those are rather trigger conditions, not the root cause. Statistics depend on the reaearch paper you look at but about as many clerks get Dupuytren as manually hard working people (though the chance for the latter to develop Dupuytren might be a little higher).

Some people report that the disease progression got less or zero after they abandoned drinking. If that is an option for you, it sure would make sense and your liver would appreciate as well.

A quickly growing and painful nodule in the hand might have another reason than Dupuytren's disease. If you look at the thread "Help Please" of this forum or at the article on Dupuytren contracture by Kristina Shaffer in emedicine (http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic774.htm), you will find a list of other potential reasons. In any case, don't rely on a diagnosis based on what people write in forums, go and see a good doctor. Your problem might be something else and the cure might be simple.

Good luck!

Wolfgang

09/05/05 02:29
SteveX

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09/05/05 02:29
SteveX

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DC triggered by injury?


Hi Wolfgang, thanks for your info, I will certainly check it out. I have already seen one Doctor (three days after trauma to both my hands) he even X-rayed them. Unfortunately he couldnt diagnose anything and just provided me with swelling/pain reducing tablets.

When the small finger on my right hand began to bend towards my palm the next day, I realized it could be Dupuytren's Contracture, as you said probably triggered by the trauma. The knuckle is painful and may be because of a torn ligament. I intend to see another Ortheopedic Doctor this week. Am currently working in Asia so have prepared documents relating to DC in case he's never heard of it.

I have already been diagnosed with this disease by a UK hand surgeon back around 1978. Had OS on my middle finger (PIP)and have not had any pain or problems until now. The finger operated on started to bend back around 4/5 years later but didnt hurt and didn't cause too much concern as I was still able to function with it ok. I have a prominent cord running from this finger down to my palm. Also knots at base of fingerand top of palm.

As for the pain I think you may be right that I have another problem perhaps, caused by the stretching of my hands.... I hope to address this if that's the case. The ring finger on my right hand is actually being pulled towards my small finger, not my palm...there is still swelling to the knuckle but the pain is not as great.

Many thanks SteveX

p.s. I fractured my right and broke my left wrists in a motorcycle accident just over a year ago...but DC didn't reappear in other fingers until now.


11/24/06 01:23
galego

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11/24/06 01:23
galego

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A viking desease? Maybe an Iberian desease.

It has to be proved this is a "vikings" disease. My family - all from Galicia, in Spain - have always suffered from Dupuytren's disease and the local surgeon has told me is pretty common in our area. They have a whole department to deal with it. This link says "the disease was seen [in Spain] in 9.9% of individuals aged 45-54 years, while the rate increased to 25.5% in patients older than 75 years" ttp://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic774.htm
There were never vinkings around here. I think genetics is going to ruin a lot of prejudices. Take a look at the following link to realize that around 64% of British genes come from .... Spain. The same goes for 20% of genes in Iceland. So Nothern Europeans... are mostly Southern!!!
http://news.scotsman.com/scitech.cfm?id=1393742006

11/24/06 01:51
Wolfgang

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11/24/06 01:51
Wolfgang

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heritage

Dupuytren is often considered a Viking's disease but maybe predominantly because it sounds adventurous and romantic. You point out the high percentage in Spain which has no Viking heritage (maybe it is rather a Gothic disease?) but Dupuytren's disease also has been documented in China and Japan where no Vikings, Celts or Coths ever came to. Also Dupuytren's disease was not described before the 17th century while a lot of other hand diseases and their cures had already been described in medivial times. My guess is that it wasn't that frequent in earlier times.

Do you possibly have a link that gives some statistics about Spanish Dupuytren patients? My impression is that in Spain there is neither NA nor radiotherapy available for Dupuytren.

You might might also have a look at www.dupuytren-online.info for some more background info.

Wolfgang

11/24/06 01:31
galego

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11/24/06 01:31
galego

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certainly a pain-in-the-neck desease.

Here is a link that essentially says that the percentages in Spain in 1988 are similar to the ones in Scandinavia(1972):
"En nuestro medio Guitian (1988) describe una prevalencia del 9,9% en pacientes de un grupo de edad comprendido entre los 45 – 54 años y de hasta un 25,5% en pacientes mayores de 75 años. Estos datos son similares a los de una serie ya clásica realizada en Escandinavia por Mikkelsen (1972). En ésta última la prevalencia global para mayores de 16 años era de un 9,4% de los hombres y de un 2,8% de las mujeres." Here is the link: http://www.secpre.org/documentos%20manual%2064.html.
I had traditional surgery 3 times and I am not aware of any other type of treatment in Spain. I would discard the gothic theory. Germanic blood is not that common in Spain, although is more frequent in Galicia: my father's village has a germanic name. Maybe this desease was infrequent the old days because people used to die much younger and it seems to be an old people desease. That hasn't been my case, though... unfortunatelly. Cheers!

11/26/06 01:06
Wolfgang

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11/26/06 01:06
Wolfgang

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where from

Galego, thanks for the reference, those percentages sound pretty typical.

With regard to Dupuytren in former times you are probably right and what I had posted was wrong. McFarlane wrote in J Hand Surg [Am]. 2002 May;27(3):385-90
"On the origin and spread of Dupuytren's disease":

"Dupuytren's disease is currently called a Viking disease on the assumption that the disease was spread to Europe and the British Isles during the Viking Age of the 9th to the 13th centuries. From a literature search, it is proposed that Dupuytren's disease existed in Europe earlier than the Viking Age and originated much earlier in prehistory."

I can't judge whether this is correct but anyway, it dosn't really matter. The Genom people will eventually be able to locate where this disease comes from (some progress has been made already) and then they can track it back.

Wolfgang

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extremity-related   Dupuytren   contracture   Rheumatoligists   pain-in-the-neck   mitochondrial   significantly   predisposition   disease   Intellectuals   epidemiological   id=1393742006   documentos%20manual%2064   unfortunatelly   Hereditary   predominantly   Unfallchirugie   dupuytren-online   male-to-female   Krause-Bergmann