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Dupuytren~sq~s in Young Patients
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06/13/01 02:34
L.

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06/13/01 02:34
L.

not registered

Thanks, Chris

Thanks for your post, Chris. It is helpful to hear of others' experiences. I'm wondering about your experience of the progression of DC. What was the timeline for your symptoms and the development of the DC?

Your post reminded me that I have heard disability rights activists remind folks that many of us will eventually face some form of debilitation at some point in our lives--hence the term "currently able-bodied." It is interesting to take in the knowledge that my debilitation will (most likely) be related to the use of my hands, and that I may face that sooner than I had thought I might.

Thanks again,

L.

08/05/01 02:06
pete mitchell

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08/05/01 02:06
pete mitchell

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DP in young patients

I contracted Dp at age 33, from a basketball injury, and had it progress for almost 2 years before surgery. Now 5 weeks after surgery i can already tell my hand will be just about 100% normal and straight. Proper physical therapy and home treatments will encourage healing. I was able to use my injured hand within about 4 weeks after surgery!

09/28/02 02:04
Maren

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09/28/02 02:04
Maren

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Firefly2000@gmx.de

I`m 19 years old and having Dupuytren`s contracture in my Ringfinger and Middle finger (not so bad)of my right hand. There`s no one in my family who had it before. Maybe there`s anyone outside in my age with the same prob, drop me a line !
Maren

10/28/02 01:53
Neil

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10/28/02 01:53
Neil

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Not so bad.......

I was diagnosed with D. C at the age of 16 and I am now 32. I have had 3 surgeries on my left hand and my ring finger now only opens to a 90 degree angle.
The toughest/most bothersome thing for me is putting a glove on my left hand. Thats it !!
In the 16 years I have had this,that's the thing that bothers me the most. The only other thing is picking up heavy items like sheets of gyproc or ends of couches. No one notices my hand unless I show it to them and I can do everything else in my life just fine. Dupuytrens is a bit of a bother, and I sympathize with people who have it worse than I do,but I figure the more you worry about it, the worse it will get.

06/29/03 02:23
holly

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06/29/03 02:23
holly

not registered

same here...

About three years ago I awoke one morning with this excruciating pain in my right pinky finger. I thought I had broken it during my sleep...maybe somehow crushing it during my sleep? Well, since I was working about 70+ hours a week at my job as a manager I couldn't really get to a doctor that day nor the next. I promised myself that if it still hurt by the third day I would have to call out and see a doctor. (I HATE NEEDLES!) The reason I didn't rush to a doctor was because I didn't see any bruising or swelling...? Get this, by the third day I woke up and NO pain whatsoever. I was able to move it without having that huge silver splint I wrapped around it. So I thought everything was fine......hum?

Just about six moths ago, that pain started to come back....not as severe though. I started to develope "the lump" in the palm under the pinky finger, nodules on the knuckle pretty rapidly. I freaked myself out thinking that it was cancerous...I'm a hypocondreact. I spent hours on the computer researching what it could be and not finding anything. Finally, I looked up tendonitis and about an hour into my studies, just about to give up, I find Dupuytren's Contracture.....Hallelujiah!!!!! I'm not going to die at 26! I read that Northern European males tend to get it between the ages of 25-35? Well, my grandfather who I'm a spitting image of was from Northern Europe (Denmark/Norway/Switzerland). No one in my immediate family has had it...yet. Only the arthritis. So I don't think it's a strong gene in the family. I read your story and many others and realize there's alot of us freakin' out.

My grandfather and I are the only one's with brown eyes,dark brown hair, a facial dimple, a space in between our two front teeth, 6'1",and 160 lbs..... in the family. Thank you for posting, and we're out there! Just like you.

04/26/04 02:57
mark hair

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04/26/04 02:57
mark hair

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12 year old with dupuytren~sq~s

I found out this morning that my 12 year old daughter has dupuyttren's. She had a lump removed from the base of her thumb. I've been reading as much as I can today and will be checking in on this site often. Thanks everyone for sharing the intel. My biggest concern, with my limited knowledge right now, what will this do to her since she has it at such an early age?

04/26/04 02:12
Frances

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04/26/04 02:12
Frances

not registered

Tonnes of info

Hi Mark,

Get yourself a cup of coffee...there's a tonne of info here on this Forum. Of particular note is the procedure affectionately known as NA and Dr. Eaton who performs it.

Warm Regards,

Frances

04/26/04 02:14
B-Eddie

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04/26/04 02:14
B-Eddie

not registered

12 year old

Mark, don't worry about your limited knowledge.
I have been reading tons over the last 3 years, and the only result is that my knowledge is still very limited !
There is no way to predict how the dupuytren is going to evolve in anyones case, so don't worry too much.
Surprising tho, apart from your kid to have the disease at such an early age, is that she has it at the thumb base. This doesn't happen often. Are you really sure it is DP ?
Anyway, think twice (or ten times) before letting her have surgery again. In some cases it MAY accelerate the DP afterwards, and surgery on the same hand can only be done 2 or 3 times.
But, keep reading .....

04/27/04 02:34
jim h

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04/27/04 02:34
jim h

not registered

first symptoms

Mark, you'll find a lot of information, photos, descriptions of surgery for extreme cases, etc. and some of it is going to be alarming. But I think I can say this with some confidence: the progression is unpredictable. While some people have serious problems, for others it remains dormant, or just annoying, for decades.

And, nodules by themselves are not a problem - only the restrictive bands need correction at some point. So don't assume the worst, despite your daughter's age.


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