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Suregry & Work? Advice Fast Please
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09/14/02 02:33
Kay

not registered

09/14/02 02:33
Kay

not registered

Suregry & Work? Advice Fast Please

I am 39 years old, female from middle Tennessee and I have had Dc for about 3 years. It started in my left hand then about 6 months later I noticed it in my right hand. The left hand has progressed slowly while my right hand has become a extremely painful with rather large nodules.
In my entire life I may have consumed 1 gallon of acholic beverages. I feel centain that this was caused from my line of employment. 3 other people doing the same job I was doing at the factory I work at have the same disease. Isn't this starge for such a rare disease?
I have since bid to another area of the factory that requires less use of my hands and now decided to have the surgery. The nodules in my right hand have gotten so large that they are repeatly getting inflamed from normal use of hand.
My main question is what do I do about work? Does this disease qualitfy under FMLA or any other laws such as American with Disabilities? I have chosen the date of Sept. 23 for surgery as I am on vacation that week but that will not cover my entire leave. The doctor said if everything went exceptionally well there was a remote possiblity I could return to work in a couple weeks with some slight restrictions. That won't cut it either with my employer. They do not offer light duty unless it is work related and they denied my first work comp claim when I first noticed the nodules and asked to see the company doctor. I have an excellent paying job for my area with good medical insurance. I cannot afford to lose my job over this.

09/14/02 02:07
JERRY 
09/14/02 02:07
JERRY 
Need Advice

I am not an attorney nor am I a medical practitioner, therefore any information I provide will be purely on a friendly basis.

I cannot go through the entire history of D/C at this time, but will attempt to help.

Dupuytren's Contracture is not a RARE disease. It happens to be quite prevalent with people of northern European ancestry.
Despite what you have been told, D/C surgery is no piece of cake. Trust me, I know. You will be subjected to much needed after care and probably the hand will not be fully restored to full function .
I do not believe you will have any chance of filing under the Disabilities act, because the medical establishment does NOT recognize D/C as being a trauma related disease. They say it is 100% genetic. It is my belief that if one has a predisposition (recessive gene) to the ailment then trauma INDEED plays a decisive role.
Your message indicates that you probably do not have the wherewithal to travel to Europe for the Aponevrotomy (Needle) procedure, thereby making surgery in your case the only option. Be certain that your surgeon is fully experienced in D/C surgery: many are NOT.
Since your time is limited, an alternative is to inquire of your physician if he is familiar with a surgical method that merely makes transverse slits in the hands, thereby releasing the cords that restrict tendon movement?
We all wish you well.

09/14/02 02:32
Gary Evans

not registered

09/14/02 02:32
Gary Evans

not registered

Need Advice

Kay,
Have your fingers started contracting or do you just have the nodules? Do you have both contraction and nodules? If you have contraction, what is the degree of contraction? You choose surgery when you can't live with your condition (for a variety of reasons). My father(he is 85) has had the nodules for 20 years and has lived with the condition. The never became very painful and never contracting.

There appears to be two types of DC. Nodules are more painful than the "dermal pits"(like a callus, with a pit in middle). It also seems that the contraction band is associated more with the "dermal pits". Is this the opinion of anyone else in the forum? Also, from the (six) people that I know who had surgery, it was very successful. They all had the "dermal pits" and not nodules.
Gary

09/14/02 02:30
JERRY 
09/14/02 02:30
JERRY 
DC on both hands.

I cannot resist! Don't you realize the poor lady cannot earn a livelyhood and requires attention NOW?

You don't have to respond to everything written and confuse people.

That is your problem and the reason you offend the readers of the forums.

09/14/02 02:35
JERRY 
09/14/02 02:35
JERRY 
DC on both hands.

I am sorry I wrote the previous message. From now on I will no longer offer any info at this site. You have taken over every issue and are the foremost authority where D/C is concerned.

On the other forum, you have taken over from GR, the webmaster who happens to be a PHYSICIAN.

09/14/02 02:00
Gary Evans

not registered

09/14/02 02:00
Gary Evans

not registered

DC on both hands.

On the "other board" I have written a total of 6 messages in the two years it has been in existence. I am interested in all of the procedures for DC, because I will probably need something done to my other hand in the future. I don't prefer surgery, it is just the procedure I had and which I am the most familiar.

Has anyone seen information (perhaps I have, but can't remember), if it is virtually certain that a person is afflicted on both hands, rather than just one. It seems as though most of us have both hands affected.
Gary

09/15/02 02:48
Eddie 
09/15/02 02:48
Eddie 
DP in both hands

Acoording to the study of Dr Moermans, about three quarters of DP patients are affected in both hands.
Ref : http://www.ccmbel.org/Chap9.html

09/16/02 02:32
Martin 
09/16/02 02:32
Martin 
Jerry

Jerry,

I find your reaction to Gary's postings childish to say the least, and your latest stance is a pity because you clearly have a lot to offer this site. I have observed this feud for a while and have looked specifically at Gary's postings, I find them informative and in no way derogatory to anyone, in this particular case his questions are relevent as Kay does not mention whether her fingers are contracting or not.

It would appear, from her posting, that Kay has large, tender nodules to the extent that her daily work is affected. Would needle aponevrotomy or transverse slits relieve her symptoms if there is no contraction of the fingers? My understanding of the needle aponevrotemy is that the chord is cut thereby relieving the contracture of the finger, and from what you say it seems that the transverse slits do the same. Do these procedures result in the nodules/dermal pits disappearing? A fasciectomy, on the other hand, removes the deseased material, nodules and all. This is my layman's understanding, please correct me if I am wrong.

Martin

09/16/02 02:43
Martin 
09/16/02 02:43
Martin 
DP in both hands

I had surgery on my left hand on July 11 after nodules and 45 degree contraction of my little finger. So far I am very pleased with the result, had no pain, was driving after 3 days, the fingers are straight and the nodule is gone. I am now busy with occupational therapy to regain the full use of my fingers, I am told this is a long process. I have a nodule forming in the palm of my right hand, no contraction of the finger, I will wait and see how it developes, but would prefer an alternative to surgery.
Martin

09/16/02 02:27
Gary Evans

not registered

09/16/02 02:27
Gary Evans

not registered

Need Advice/Surgery

Martin,
Glad to hear that you are pleased with your surgery so far. What you do in the next three months will make a big difference. Exercise fingers as much as you can. It will become a habit and you will see continuous progress. With my surgery (90 degrees), the 2nd thru the 6th month is when I really saw hand get better. The Coban (a 3M product) at 10 minutes at a time worked great. What kind of surgery did you have? The Zig-zag Fasciectomy? What kind of a surgeon did you have?
I agree with you about next time doing something else if it is available. Surgery (for me) was a pleasant surprise from what I was led to believe it would be like. I thought it would be worse than it was.
Good luck with your progress,
Gary

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