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Massage therapy
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02/13/13 20:40
aryan 
02/13/13 20:40
aryan 
Re: Massage therapy

After unsuccessful RT last year, I have been having massage therapy for DD with Stephen Jeffrey. After only three very relaxing and holistic treatments I am already feeling the benefits. The nodules on both hands have softened and flattened and there is no sign of progression and no new nodules. The aching and stiffness which I think were side effects from RT is also getting better.

I am feeling really encouraged and for the first time in months I have stopped obsessing so much about my hands! I only wish I had opted for massage therapy as my first line of treatment when I was initially diagnosed.

Wouldn't it be wonderful if massage therapy, the most non-invasive and benign of treatments, could stop the progress of DD and minimise nodules?

I will report my progress.

aryan

03/12/13 18:11
IanHawkridge 
03/12/13 18:11
IanHawkridge 
Re: Massage therapy

Having read a post by Stephen Jeffrey, regarding promising results from using deep tissue massage techniques, I tried (two weeks ago) Lava Shell (hot clam shell) massage - which is reputed to have some deep tissue massage qualities. My Duputrens is not that severe, but the immediate effects were good, and although there was some re-hardening overnight, most of the beneficial effects have substantially remained. I`ll let you know how I get on after another few treatments. ian

07/02/13 12:12
stephenjeffrey 
07/02/13 12:12
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

stephenjeffrey:
stephenjeffrey:
I realize this post is quite old, but I wanted to let you know I have so far treated 2 clients with early onset ( 1 client with a cord and 1 v small nodule the other with a cord and 2 pea sized nodules causing a 20 degree bend) who have both responded well to cross fiber frictions and slow controlled compression techniques.

Unfortunately I cannot find research evidence to support massage therapys use, but i have talked to a small number of therapists in the USA and Canada who have also had favourable outcomes.

Stephen Jeffrey West London UK

Just to update you on the 2 above clients progress.

Both clients have maintained their improved condition and I am pleased to report no new nodules, no new contractures. :)

Both clients continue to come once per month for other issues that build up as part of their jobs. I dedicate 20 mins of each session to checking their palms and fingers for any warning signs and release any tension with the techniques mentioned above. The only time I became concerned was when 1 client returned from 2 weeks golfing in Ireland, the cord that been inactive had tightened up and was trying to start contracting. However by the next session it had softened and stopped pulling.


A new client.
From nov 2012 I have been treating a client with a 70 degree contracture of the PIP joint of the little finger of the right hand. This was a case of rapid onset ( 6 degrees per month ) during the preceding 12 mths. The palmer fascia proximal to and over the MCP joint was thickened and tight. The involved PIP joint was red and sore (possibly from attempts at too much stretching).
The good news is the contracture has stopped increasing, the palmer fascia has normalised and is soft, the PIP joint is no longer red or sore.
However, because the original angle of contracture has not yet reversed it is still 70 degrees, we are starting a day taping and night splinting program. (My client may be clenching fists during sleep.)
I will let you know of any progress in due course.

Regards Stephen Jeffrey

Hi everyone just to update you all.

The above client with a 70 degree contracture of her little finger, did stop contracting, however there was no reversal in this contracture so she had NA with Dr Bainbridge. I cannot comment further as to her currant status as I have lost contact with her.

With all my other clients, up to 3 yrs later, there are no new cords/nodules. Massage Therapy once per month seems to be enough frequency to halt dups completely. On occasions when dups activity has been "provoked" by long hours golfing, rowing, potting, handcrafts ect any threat or sense of dups activity has been eradicated/switched off by massage.

This year we will be investigating as part of home care the use of :-

1/ silicone gel pads for scar tissue.
Used at night, sealed over nodules or puckered areas of hands.

2/ Therma mit
a microwavable wheat lined mitton for hand pain.

3/ parrafin wax bath.
Originally used for treating arthritus may offer help for dups that causes pain.

Later in the year I hope to make a video of the typical massage protocols that I use. This is intended to encourage my fellow massage therapists to engage in treating DC and give DC sufferers a chance to see how the techniques are used.

Regards Stephen Jeffrey

07/05/13 06:04
myjade84 
07/05/13 06:04
myjade84 
Re: Massage therapy

I have tried massage and acupuncture too but they didn't worked. I'm planning for the surgery now. I'm new here and i read all the posts to learn.

07/06/13 03:36
LubaM. 
07/06/13 03:36
LubaM. 
Re: Massage therapy

myjade84:
I have tried massage and acupuncture too but they didn't worked. I'm planning for the surgery now. I'm new here and i read all the posts to learn.
Welcome to the forum... Which fingers/joints are involved? what is the degree of contracture? why did you decide to opt for surgery? Have you considered the less invasive procedures, such as Radiotherapy, Needle Aponeurotomy and Xiaflex?.... just asking...

07/06/13 12:05
aryan 
07/06/13 12:05
aryan 
Re: Massage therapy

There's massage and massage and I think it has to be specialised to have any effect. Certainly Stephen Jeffrey has helped keep my DD at bay. He has done a lot of research into massage for DD and has found techniques which seem to work very successfully on the early symptoms of the disease. My DD hasn't progressed and the nodules are softer and smaller. I don't think they will go away all together but I have no contracture and I will continue to have regular massage therapy in order to keep it that way. It is very reassuring to have found a treatment which will hopefully keep my hands in reasonable working order into the future.

I know no one treatment suits everyone but I would urge anyone with early symptoms to try specialised massage before going for more invasive therapies. It just seems to make sense to me.

07/19/13 13:30
mbird 
07/19/13 13:30
mbird 
Dupuytrens on other body parts.

Does anybody know about Dupuytren nodes and cords appearing on other body parts besides hands and feet. Would appreciate any info.

Edited 07/19/13 13:31

07/19/13 15:05
wach 

Administrator

07/19/13 15:05
wach 

Administrator

Re: Massage therapy

Nodules might appear elsewhere http://www.dupuytren-online.info/related_diseases.html but it's unclear to what extent they are related to Dupuytren's. Cords are considered a result of the pulling Forces in the hand and are less likely to appear elsewhere.

Wolfgang

mbird:
Does anybody know about Dupuytren nodes and cords appearing on other body parts besides hands and feet. Would appreciate any info.

07/21/13 06:14
flojo 
07/21/13 06:14
flojo 
Re: Massage therapy

A night splint is a gradual push to straighten the hand where as deep massage is much harsher. I have been hesitant about deep pressure or intense stretching as trauma to the hand seems to trigger Dupuytren's. I haven't seen any other discussion about deep massage being trauma to the hand, but it just seems to me like it would be or could be.

Watch it and if it seems to be helping not triggering, you'll know best.

07/29/13 16:56
stephenjeffrey 
07/29/13 16:56
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

flojo:
A night splint is a gradual push to straighten the hand where as deep massage is much harsher. I have been hesitant about deep pressure or intense stretching as trauma to the hand seems to trigger Dupuytren's. I haven't seen any other discussion about deep massage being trauma to the hand, but it just seems to me like it would be or could be.

Watch it and if it seems to be helping not triggering, you'll know best.

Hi Flojo

I completely understand your hesitation about causing trauma. This is why any intervention needs to be specifically tailored to suit the individual so as not to cause inflammation or trauma and why I do not agree with "vigorous stretching".
The compressions I use are only done after considerable time has been spent preparing the target tissues along with treatment of the whole limb.
There is now some research in support of compression "normalizing" cell activity.

In addition when the compressive forces are released this may enhance the work of collagen degradation genes.

Regards Stephen Jeffrey

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