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Massage therapy
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12/10/13 17:41
stephenjeffrey 
12/10/13 17:41
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

Hi again all. FYI,

As part of my continued research into the use of massage therapy for Dupuytren's contracture I have obtained copies of these two books. Rattray's clinical massage therapy and Tidy's massage therapy and remedial exercises.

Rattray's book is the bible of some the most highly trained massage therapists in the world, (within the Canadian RMT system in British Columbia and Ontario.)
The assessment and treatment of Dupuytren's contracture ( table of contents below) is covered over 9 pages. So I am very glad to tell you their suggested treatment protocol is very similar to that of my own. It also say's the earlier treatment can be started, the better the chances of being effective.

Tidy's book was in print from 1932 till 1984. I have a 1963 copy that suggests the use of cross fiber frictions and deep massage for early stage Dupuytren's contracture.

12/20/13 13:35
mbird 
12/20/13 13:35
mbird 
Re: Massage therapy

Thank you Stephen for your reply on Massage Therapy. I now have dupuytrends on both hands. I had a very severe broken wrist which required 3 surgeries, developed Dupuytrends and now its on my "good hand". However, I have just found what I think is Dupuytrends on one of my toes, I have a hard lump on the 3rd toe and its bending my toe in towards the ball of my foot. Any Suggestions all you good people. mbird

12/30/13 16:42
allisun 
12/30/13 16:42
allisun 
Re: Massage therapy

I experienced recurrence nearly 2 years after Radiation Therapy concluded (think it was provoked by over-exertion).
I also found a new contracture just beginning to start in my pinky PIP joint.

I reached out to Stephen Jeffrey and he provided his massage protocol which I passed on to my massage therapist. I have been receiving massage therapy for 4 months now and so far things are stable. I even experienced a release of the slight contracture that was beginning to form in my pinky, and it has not returned. I was going weekly for massage the first 5 weeks and have cut back to every 2-3 weeks.

12/30/13 16:51
wach 

Administrator

12/30/13 16:51
wach 

Administrator

Re: Massage therapy

From your experience is that something we could do ourselves? Would be great because we could do it more frequently.

Wolfgang

allisun:
I experienced recurrence nearly 2 years after Radiation Therapy concluded (think it was provoked by over-exertion).
I also found a new contracture just beginning to start in my pinky PIP joint.

I reached out to Stephen Jeffrey and he provided his massage protocol which I passed on to my massage therapist. I have been receiving massage therapy for 4 months now and so far things are stable. I even experienced a release of the slight contracture that was beginning to form in my pinky, and it has not returned. I was going weekly for massage the first 5 weeks and have cut back to every 2-3 weeks.

12/31/13 23:54
allisun 
12/31/13 23:54
allisun 
Re: Massage therapy

No, it's not. You need a massage therapist who knows what they're doing to follow the protocol. It's also not just in the hand, it starts with the shoulder and goes into the flexors in the arm, to help loosen things up before they even start with the hand.

12/31/13 23:58
allisun 
12/31/13 23:58
allisun 
Re: Massage therapy

I also don't think frequency is important here. To start with, it's recommended to go once a week for the first month or so. Stephen can speak to the fact he only treats his established clients once a month with no need for more frequent massage.

Things I do at home for myself are night splinting, and in the winter wearing gloves, hot baths and weekly paraffin treatments.

05/15/14 07:42
Alecroyer 
05/15/14 07:42
Alecroyer 
Re: Massage therapy

Doing a massage after the surgery or after diagnosed is little risky and if person who is doing the massage should have the tact how to do it. It needs to be very careful.

Edited 05/15/14 08:07

05/31/14 09:31
stephenjeffrey 
05/31/14 09:31
stephenjeffrey 

Re: Massage therapy

Three and a half years ago I put out this appeal http://www.massageprofessionals.com/foru...ens-contracture
for help from my fellow massage therapists.

A client (a dentist ) had shown me his hand with a 15+ degree contracture to his right ring finger and wanted to know what I knew about the condition. His Doctor had warned him against surgery so after 2 months of research and a revisit to his Doctor we all came to the decision that the same techniques I had used on scar tissue had got to be worth trying.

The contraction stopped after only two treatments, he continued to have his once a month massage where on occasion the the contracture would try to "get going" again, being particularly provoked by his golfing holidays, but always subsiding after treatment.

He retired from practice yesterday thanking me for helping get through his working life without an operation.

Now I am left wondering, if with more time to play golf, we might have to keep a closer eye on his Dups.

07/23/14 14:25
jaysoni 
07/23/14 14:25
jaysoni 
Re: Massage therapy

Annmarie:
Has anyone tried intense hand massage as a treatment? I don't actually have this condition, but my boyfriends mother has just been diagnosed.
Im training to be a sports massage therapist so my area of study is soft tissue manpulation and I cant see any logical reason why this woudnt work! Proper use of massage and deep friction can break down nodules, adhesions and even fibrosis in muscles!
Id love to work on my boyfriends mum but she lives too far away so if anyone else has had good results working with a qualified deep tissue massage therapist Id be interested to know! Or maybe someone would consider trying it? Seems to me a lot less extreme than radiation or surgery!
Annmarie (Ireland)


Allison Eaton While no two massage therapy training courses are identical, typical instruction entails basic studies in anatomy, physiology, pathology and kinesiology - where it goes from there is entirely dependent upon the healing arts school in which one enrolls. For example, if you would like a foundational course in bodywork, then common techniques taught in most massage therapy training programs encompass Swedish massage, sports massage and deep tissue massage. However, if you would like to take more advanced massage therapy training, then a large number of alternative health schools may provide in-depth, practical training a wider assortment of massage modalities.

07/23/14 21:36
cilla 
07/23/14 21:36
cilla 
Re: Massage therapy

I have had 3 professional people recommend massage (all female incidentally). But the hand surgeon says it is not good. Then one of the 3 women- a physiotherapist- said best to stick with what the surgeon/consultant recommends.

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