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considering surgery
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01/02/02 01:20
Bob1

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01/02/02 01:20
Bob1

not registered

considering surgery

I wonder what will finally happen if one doesn't cure (or care about) his/her DC ? any stories or testimonies ? Please.

01/05/02 01:53
Bill K.

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01/05/02 01:53
Bill K.

not registered

considering surgery

If your DC dosn't progress any further than just nodules in the palm, as it does with most people who have it, then nothing bad will happen to you if you ignore it. But if your fingers start contracting, and the contraction continues, you will eventually end up with a hand that will be beyond the expertise of 99.99% of the doctors doing DC surgery to fix. So watch it closely, and don't let the contraction go too far. And when you do go in for surgery, go to a "hand surgeon" preferable and orthepedic hand surgeon. Stay away from plastic surgeons. I know that a lot of them do DC surgery, but if they run into anything outside of just cutting on soft tissue, the surgery could get way over their head.

01/10/02 01:03
Caroline

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01/10/02 01:03
Caroline

not registered

considering surgery

I was referred to a hand surgeon recently, and he says that surgery is an option, but no one will force me. He also said that if it gets very bad, that the surgery would be much more difficult for him and me (but there's no way to predict). The involvement for me, besides palmar lumps (no real problem there), is the first joint in my little finger (bent at about 40% angle) with a very large lump between the knuckle and first joint. It does seem to be getting worse fairly rapidly (noticeable difference in last two months). The only function problem at present is great frustration in playing piano (for my own enjoyment only). I just don't know whether to go ahead with the surgery now or to wait. If I wait, we will have moved 250 miles away, and I'm concerned about finding another good surgeon, etc.
Any advice on early surgery to avoid more difficult and extensive surgery later?

01/10/02 01:04
Gary Evans

not registered

01/10/02 01:04
Gary Evans

not registered

Doing nothing

Caroline,
Tough call. I have surgery coming up this Tuesday. My DC has progressed rapidly from 0 to 90 degrees in 12 months. I can't wait any longer. The only reason to wait is for the cooagenase injections and that might be a few years away.

I was going to wait, but it got too bad too fast.
Good luck,

Gary

01/12/02 01:39
Bill K.

not registered

01/12/02 01:39
Bill K.

not registered

Nada

Caroline, my experience from six surgeries is that once the finger starts contracting, it is ready for surgery. If you get surgery too soon, especially when the nodules are still in their soft stage, it might come back much quicker. If you let the contraction go too far, it will make 100% successful surgery more difficult. I let my first one go way too long, and it was not possible to fix my finger so that I would have full use of it. Also, for you and the other people reading this, I would like to say that post-op exercising of the hand is extremely important. You need to start tendon flexion exercises just as soon as the splint and dressing put on at surgery come off. Scar tissue will be forming internally, and you need to keep the tendons moving to keep the scar tissue around them broken loose until it is through forming. Your doctor or hand therapist will show you the exercises, and you must do them without fail no matter how much it might hurt. I can't stress that enough. Bill

05/02/05 02:58
Zipper Head

not registered

05/02/05 02:58
Zipper Head

not registered

Nada

Yes, Bill is right about that. I have had three painful prominate nodules in my hand for eight years now. Prominant bands run from the nodules to my middle finger. Still, my digit remains straight.

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