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Dupuytren's could be a symptom of thyroid disease
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01/03/01 01:23
Lyn Mynott

not registered

01/03/01 01:23
Lyn Mynott

not registered

Dupuytren's could be a symptom of thyroid disease

I run the Thyroid Action Group and have found information in a book by Martin Budd that Dupuytrens was considered a symptom of thyroid disease by doctors in 1917. Thyroid disease gives rise to many, many signs and symptoms and I believe that thyroid disease is the cause of many other diseases. It is linked to ME, MS, Depression, Altzheimers, ADHD, and Autism. The blood tests can show normal but you can still have thyroid disease because the doctors are not doing T3 testing, and antibody testing for this disease.
I am very interested in how many of you have thyroid disease or have been tested for this in the past. I would be pleased if you would contact me. Lyn Mynott, Thyroid Action Group.

03/14/01 01:14
Wally Allan

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03/14/01 01:14
Wally Allan

not registered

Thyroid Connection

14 Mar. 2001

Reply: Dupuytren's and Thyroid disease

I correlated Dupuytren's Contractures (DC) with my thyroidism after my third case of DC in 1997. I can not be sure this third case was a true case but it deserves mention. I have not been sure of a connection between DC and thyroidism because I have no evidence other than my own case. Also salt retention (fluid retention) and iodism may all be suspect as they may all coexist at the same time in my own particular case of thyroidism.

My cases of DC do not correspond to other descriptions I find in this forum. Two of my cases of DC have been mild with no pain or progression from the first day it was noticed. The DC appeared in the left palm, only one tendon, apparently overnight in 1978. I was in salt retention, bromism, iodism and either hyperthyroidism, or hypothyroidism at the time. I began in hyperthyroidism but it changed to hypothyroidism and I can't remember in which stage the DC appeared. In 1992 the right hand came down with DC in two tendons, apparently overnight. I was in pronounced hypothyroidism at the time and possibly salt retention and iodism, but not bromism. One may be complete unaware of salt retention and the physician has no clinical test to reveal it. In 1997, again in pronounced hypothyroidism and possibly salt retention and iodism, I felt for two hours a very strange feeling in my right hand which I thought was DC. I stretched my hand out straight as possible for hours while experiencing the feeling. There was no further progression of DC during this attack. I often get tetany in the right hand but this was not tetany, the feeling was unlike anything I have ever felt, before or since. From 1978 to 1997 the DC appeared only when I was heavily into thyroidism, at other times I was mild in hypothyroidism from 1979 to 1997.

I believe Lyn is right, thyroidism can exist without blood test revealing the disorder. One important, but overlooked, factor is that certain drugs defeat the thyroid tests. My sister, two friends, and I have been in thyroidism without our physicians uncovering the aliment. I had thought for the most part it was because we were subclinical, that is, too mild to show in a measurement. In my friends' cases the physician probably did not recognized symptoms that should lead to thyroid tests. Both my sister and I had tests that failed to confirm thyroidism. At one time my sister was in a severe thyroid storm (severe hyperthyroidism) and the physician suspected it was a storm but the tests did not confirm it. Eventually it was determined she was in aspirin poisoning and aspirin defeats the thyroid test. My sister died a classic death of hypothyroidism without her physician being aware of her hypothyroidism. I did not know of the classic death, or that she was in hypothyroidism, until three days before her death when I read of it in a 40 year old textbook, and then all of the clues came together. For the present, at least until the physician get their thyroid act together, I think one should rely on symptoms (the medical practice of 40 years ago) rather than blood tests.

I am not medically trained but I am a physicist and have had to study my own medical problems.

.

07/29/03 02:19
Linda 
07/29/03 02:19
Linda 
I have both DC and Graves Disease

I was diagnosed with both Dupuytren's and Graves' Disease (hyperthyroidism) within a few months in early 2002. Judging from the symptoms, believe I had subclinical Graves' Disease for some time before it was actually diagnosed. I had always wondered if there was some correlation between these conditions, but never could find anything about them being related. If anyone has heard of an article or study that indicates some sort of connection, I'd be interested in hearing about them.
My hyperthyroidism is pretty much controlled through medication, and my Dupuytren's doesn't seem to have progressed in the past year. But both are unpredictable. Who knows what happens next.

07/30/03 02:15
Frank Merry

not registered

07/30/03 02:15
Frank Merry

not registered

Dupuytrens and thyroid disease

What a curious query! I had my thyroid removed over 20 years ago due to cancer. Dupuytrens was diagnosed soon after, and has a major affect on my life, as it affects both of my hands. I also have Ledderhose disease. I look forward to seeing more responses to this message.

Frank Merry
Maplewood, MN

10/03/06 02:50
matt 
10/03/06 02:50
matt 
kaiser

I was diagnosed w/ hypothyroidism as a teen and have taken "synthroid" tablets daily for the past 30+ years. I contracted DC in my mid twenties and have had 2 surgeries on my left hand and 2 NA's on my right. My right hand remains very agressive and will soon need another NA from Dr. Denkler.
FYI... I also have been type 1 diabetic since age 9 and have had (successful) frozen shoulder manipulations on both sides.
Are these all related? I have no doubt they are.

10/03/06 02:02
Randy H.

not registered

10/03/06 02:02
Randy H.

not registered

kaiser

matt:

Frozen should and Dups are part of the same family of connective tissue disorder. I have had FS as well. No fun.

Your case is unfortunately rather aggressive. However, certainly there are those with a similar disease who have never used synthroid.

You are in a unique experiential position to evaluate the relative merits of Open Surgery and NA. How functional is the left hand compared to the right? How much better at slowing the disease has the Open Surgery been compared to NA? Has there been any discussion of moving you up the ladder to OS on the left hand because NA recurrence is too fast? How eager are you to avoid further OS?

10/03/06 02:15
matt 
10/03/06 02:15
matt 
kaiser

Randy, I suppose I do have a unique perspective to share...

Left Hand: I first noticed contracture on ring finger of left hand 20 years ago (I'm 47 now), and had it operated on the next year. I had never heard of NA at the time. It took over 15 years to return, but 4 years ago I had a more extensive surgery (4 fingers + palm)on same hand. What I remember most from both surgeries is the excruciating recovery/therapy. I think my recovery was worse than most I've read about here because it took me months of painful therapy before I had any real function and over 6 months before scar tissue had softened enough to regain seminormal functioning. And I was going to therapy almost every day! Now my left hand remains pretty disease free and functional, though PIP joint on little finger is frozen at 90 degree angle, and I've lost a bit of feeling on side of pinkie. My surgeon had warned me about possibilities of both occuring.
Now there are some nodules slowly creeping back, but compared to my other hand they're hardly noticable. I figure it's just a matter of time though...

Right Hand: I noticed right hand contracting about same time as 2nd surgery on left hand. I had asked my surgeon and he suggested surgery on that hand also. Being right handed, and my history of hard recovery, I was (and am)scared to death of going through a similar rehab on my right hand, which I depend on way more than my left. So I researched and learned about this relatively new NA proceedure being performed by Dr Eaton in Florida.
I flew to Florida for NA in March 2005, and was of course ecstatic at the immediate results. Pain free and fully functional! Too good to be true as it turned out, within 8 months my hand was back to where it was pre NA. I had 2nd NA on same hand in March of this year, almost 1 year to the day after 1st. This was performed by Dr Denkler, because his office is quite close. Again, great immediate results. Again, quick return of symptoms, this time almost immediate. Now it is little over 6 months out and the DC has returned worse than before. I have great respect for the work done by both Eaton and Denkler, but I also think I'm one of those uncommon cases where NA is only a temorary band-aid. I still can't fathom the thought of having a non funcioning right hand for 6+ months by having surgery, so my current strategy is to keep doing NA's until a better solution emerges. I've discussed w/ Denkler the possibility of radiation post NA, and I see there has been some recent discussion of this here, but most radiation discussion to date pertains to early stage DC.

So, to summarize, for me at least, the surgery actually was more effective in providing longer term relief from DC, but the cost in terms of pain and rehabilitation makes it a daunting option at best. I think that for people with less aggressive disease NA is a better way to go.

By the way, my health provider(Kaiser)will gladly cover the cost of surgery and therapy (easily $25K+), but has scoffed at the notion of covering NA, so I pay out of pocket

Hope that helps.









10/03/06 02:57
Tommy

not registered

10/03/06 02:57
Tommy

not registered

kaiser

Matt,

Earlier this year someone made reference to having NA from a Kaiser CHS in Northern California. It might have been in the Sacremento area if my memory serves. If you scroll back far enough you'll probably find some info on this.

10/04/06 02:42
Luba M.

not registered

10/04/06 02:42
Luba M.

not registered

Kaiser Dr. in Sacramento does NA

Matt,
Below is the information re: a Kaiser Dr. in Sacramento that does NA.

I saved the information because I too belong to Kaiser (L.A. area), and was surprised to hear that one of their Drs. did NA in Sacramento. (My L.A. area Kaiser orthopedic hand surgeon said he would not operate until my PIP contracture was significant... 45% or more....big mistake....at the time I did not know any better.

Thanks to this forum....I had a successful NA done by Dr. Denkler in July 2006....I should have done it way before my PIP had a 45% contracture, as it is hard to get great results on that joint when its over 40%, and Dr. Denkler had to do alot of repair on the PIP joint...if there is a next time for me, I'll do NA as soon as there is a visible contracture.


HERE IS THE PREVIOUS POST::::
"""~Subject: Another Doctor in Calif performing N.A.
Name: Al
On Feb 1st Dr David Evans a certified hand surgeon at Kaiser Permanente in Sacramento sucessfully performed needle apoeurotomy on my left hand. This was my second N.A. treatment, my first was in Paris with Dr Lermusiaux in May 2004.
When I first approached Dr Evans about N.A. he was reluctant because he normally performs surgery for Dupuytrens disease. I shared information about several websites that he could research to learn more about this procedure.
After he had a conversation with Dr Denkler he agreed to perform N.A. on my hand. He has not been Paris Trained.
I had a follow up visit with him yesterday and he told me has performed N.A. on three other patients.
Kaiser Permanente is an HMO and he will only be treating patients that are Kaiser members."""

10/07/06 02:52
Janey

not registered

10/07/06 02:52
Janey

not registered

Dupuytren's disease

I have early stages of this disease in both hands. The left hand is worse than the right. I have tingling in my left hand, middle finger and some numbness at the nail on the right side. Is this normal, or could it be something else.
Thanks,
Janey

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