| Lost password
53 users onlineYou are not loggend in.  Login
History of DC studies
 1
 1
06/29/01 02:08
Bob1

not registered

06/29/01 02:08
Bob1

not registered

History of DC studies

I wonder why DC was discovered only last century The disease manifests itself so clearly that there is no need to discover it. It is not a tiny virus. And how that disease was considered and treated before, in ancient times ? Was it so frequent as nowdays ? is it not connected to modern urbanization and stress ? and what happens to the people who neglect it ? For example, in poor countries people have no means for its treatment. Is it more widely spread there ? It is so strange that it appears only in extremities, and not in the whole body, like cancer.
Ani idea or info on subject, please.
Thanks.

07/01/01 02:39
L.

not registered

07/01/01 02:39
L.

not registered

History of DC

Hello!

According to Drs. Marie Badalamente and Lawrence Hurst, the condition we know as Dupuytren's Contracture was mentioned in Early European medical literature as far back as the 1600s. In the early 1800s, Baron Guillaume Dupuytren studied contracture of the palmar fascia and performed surgery on patients who had what we now call Dupuytren's Contracture.

Genetics seem to play a key role in DC, which may explain why we don't hear more about DC appearing in less affluent/developed societies. I once read an interesting web page (I tried to find the link for you, but could not) about studies regarding the genetic spread of the disease. Studying the vector of DC, scientists seem convinced that the Vikings provided the genetic pool for the disease and spread it as they conquered other countries. Hence, most people with the disease have Northern European ancestors. Many are also Celtic--particularly from parts of the British Isles that were invaded by the Vikings. Only a few cases have shown in patients of non-European ancestry.

I'll try to find the URL for the web site with the information. I'm guessing you'd be interested.

Like you, I find it interesting that this condition is localized in the hands (plus in the feet for those with plantar fibromatosis and in the penis for men with Peyronie's Disease). I can only guess that there is something unique about the connective tissue in these areas of our bodies--after all, in each area, the relationship of skin to the underlying tissues is very important for grip, traction, friction, and sensation. This is just my speculation, but maybe the connective tissues in these areas are unique.

You may be interested in the following site, which has information about the aetiology and pathoanatomy of DC:

http://wheeless.belgianorthoweb.be/o2/192.htm

Best wishes,

L.

07/06/01 02:17
Bob1

not registered

07/06/01 02:17
Bob1

not registered

more history

Thanks for additional info.
Please note that between non-European people DC is most spread among Japanese, the most industrialized non-European nation. As you noted, first symptoms of DC were mentionned not earlier than 1600 (= beginning of industrial revolution). If Vikings were responsable for the desease, that would be mentionned in their legends and sagas. I like nordic litterature and their mythology, and no mention of a desease similar to DC. Not to forget, that vikings were warriors, and would not lack to mention such a debilitating desease. What about Island and its mythology ?
I have been there and havent noticed any special, neither in their ancient itterature.

 1
 1
debilitating   Celtic--particularly   pathoanatomy   industrialized   relationship   speculation   extremities   interesting   Contracture   belgianorthoweb   urbanization   bodies--after   Badalamente   information   connective   disease   Dupuytren   fibromatosis   non-European   interested