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How fast will the disease progress?
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07/19/04 02:07
Eddie 
07/19/04 02:07
Eddie 
Wording

I think we have to be careful with some words.
Recurrence means getting the problem back IN THE SAME PLACE, so it is not the same as escalating, which could mean getting it in other places of the hand.

07/19/04 02:37
paulette

not registered

07/19/04 02:37
paulette

not registered

escalating vs recurrence

thank you Eddie for clearing that up...I was also just passing the info from surgeons and hand therapists...guess what ever works with as few risks as possible is the best solution..I still wish there was more research being done as to causes and what not to take..since stopping g/c and msn the bump on my wrist went down a little..

07/19/04 02:14
Charlie Wicker

not registered

07/19/04 02:14
Charlie Wicker

not registered

Impossible to tell

I've read a fair bit of information and the consensus is that the progression is truly random. You may have rapid progression and then have it stop for a decade. Or it moves slowly. The only thing that is known is that it doesn't improve on its own. Frustratingly, it's always a wait and see. The key bit of advice is to act when it is mild with slight bending so whatever procedure you choose can approach 100% success.

-Charlie

btw, I'm 35 and have a lot of activity in both hands with lumps & chords but nothing that has caused actual contraction yet. I'm in a wait & see mode. I'm, of course, hoping that it slows/stops for a long long time.

07/19/04 02:13
steve 
07/19/04 02:13
steve 
recurrance vs extension

recurrance correctly pointed out is in the same spot...extension is showing up somewhere else. surgery is less likely to have recurrance but much more likely to have extensions of the disease.

07/20/04 02:02
John

not registered

07/20/04 02:02
John

not registered

NA

Steve,
Could you point me to the source of your information? I have never read what you have stated.

07/20/04 02:57
Randy H.

not registered

07/20/04 02:57
Randy H.

not registered

NA vs SURGERY

Charlie, I believe your your BTW requires a more through explanation of the facts. The best thing to do for a contraction of less than 30 degrees is **nothing**. Beyond that point action should be taken. Acting sooner is better than later as the curvature progresses. The two options currently available are Traditional Invasive Surgery, OR "NA". The "action point" accepted for traditional open hand surgery is approaching 45 degrees. Beyond this point the chances for the best outcome begin to diminish. However, with NA, the opportunity to act starts at about 35 degrees, depending on how specific the cords to be severed are. In both cases, if the contraction is progressing rapidly, the sooner the better.

Here's the **big** difference between the two current options. In the majority if cases, traditional surgery creates internal and external scar tissue due to the invasive nature of the procedure. This scar tissue often prevents a full correction to 0 degrees if contraction. NA, however, does not produce scar tissue and therefore does not suffer from this liability. Read the numerous posts of those who have had NA. Though every case is unique, the % of correction is generally greater with NA than what is reported with Invasive surgery. The lack of scar tissue is, I believe, is the difference. In any case, anyone reading this post with a single contraction of > 45 degrees should immediately schedule a procedure. Do the research and decide between full open hand surgery and NA and pull the trigger *now*. Less than 35 degrees, bide your time and study your options.

07/20/04 02:03
JERRY 
07/20/04 02:03
JERRY 
NA vs SURGERY

Surgery may not have a higher recurrence rate than NA; however the fact is that SURGERY BEGETS SURGERY due to its trauma causing effect.

Exacerbation may exhibit itself in the other hand or in the soles of the feet. In males it has been connected with Peyronies disease.

Since there is virtually no trauma involved with the NA procedure, the discussion should end at this point.

07/20/04 02:34
John

not registered

07/20/04 02:34
John

not registered

NA

Jerry,
Is this just your idea or is there something written that would support what you say?

07/20/04 02:30
paulette

not registered

07/20/04 02:30
paulette

not registered

surgery...not

Don't think this is just Jerry's opinion. I believe he bases this on all the posts and his research..I know many who have had the surgery and came out with butchered hands and the disease continued even after skin grafts. I had two such surgeries and when I was told the dup wouldn't grow back where it was skin grafted, I was the one who was dupped. I thank Jerry for this site and only wish it was on when I had the surgeries many years ago with no success.

07/20/04 02:34
paulette

not registered

07/20/04 02:34
paulette

not registered

surgery...not

I also wanted to add that several honest surgeons and hand therapist used almost the same wording saying that surgery is not a cure but can actually cause more surgery..enough said...

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