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Should I get surgery
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 1
01/24/04 01:09
Kenny Watkins

not registered

01/24/04 01:09
Kenny Watkins

not registered

Should I get surgery

I was just diagnosed with Dupuytren's. My doctor told me to get on the Internet to learn more about the disease. The profile of those who get it fits me to a tee. I'm 44 years old and my family came over from Wales. Weird isn't it? I would like to get feed back from those who have had the surgery to see if it's something I want to or should do. I can't lay my hand flat anymore and have several growths in the palm of my hand.

01/25/04 01:10
Sean 
01/25/04 01:10
Sean 
Duputren~sq~s

Kenny,
You can have surgery or NA or do nothing. If the dupuytren's doesn't advance further, you might not need to do anything. Often that is the case and generally it is not painful.
I would suggest you go to Dr. Eaton and ask him which procedure is best for your situation. It is different for different people.
I had surgery two years ago on a finger that had contracted to 90 degrees. It is at 0 degrees now and you can't tell I have Dupuytren's. If you do have surgery, make sure it is done by a hand surgeon using the latest techniques of micro surgery. Hand surgery has advanced considerably in the past 15 years.
Good luck

01/25/04 01:47
Randy H.

not registered

01/25/04 01:47
Randy H.

not registered

Expand your options!

Sean is exactly right. You have options, and there is no reason for haste. Unfortunately, Dr. Eason is currently the ONLY qualified American micro hand surgeon qualified to properly evaluate all your options. At this point all other qualified American hand surgeon can only offer you one thing: Open up your hand and dig out all the diseases tissue. As a hand surgeon, Eaton is unique in that he has also studied and now practices this relatively new approach: NA. Yes, he's in Florida. But if he thinks NA would be an appropriate first line of defense, why nuke the whole city when one Smart Bomb can make a direct hit and free your finger(s)? Traditional surgery will always remain an option if your disease is not particularly impressed with NA as a far less invasive first step.

You came to the right spot. Get educated!

01/25/04 01:28
Thoughtful

not registered

01/25/04 01:28
Thoughtful

not registered

Which surgeon to use?

Sean,

As you have had such successful surgery, I am sure you wouldn't mind recommending your surgeon?
It was such an impressive result I wouldn't mind using him/her myself.


01/25/04 01:36
Sean 
01/25/04 01:36
Sean 
Surgery

Thoughtful,
I thought you insisted only on NA? Remember, you really don't like surgery or anyone who has had a successful outcome.

01/25/04 01:26
Amy G.

not registered

01/25/04 01:26
Amy G.

not registered

Kenny Watkins

Whatever you do, don't listen to Sean/Gary.

02/07/04 01:28
Sara

not registered

02/07/04 01:28
Sara

not registered

Hackers

OK Sean, I hold my hand up,I was trying to get you to tell people who your surgeon was. But I think this is far more worrying. How did you know I advocated NA unless you are a hacker?!! It gave me the creeps. All my details have been correct, bar my Christian name. I have no problem revealing all if necessary. How about you? This thing really upset me. I thought we were helping one another.

02/07/04 01:58
Traudl

not registered

02/07/04 01:58
Traudl

not registered

Kenny

Kenny, I cannot advise you re surgery. I diagnosed myself on the net, found this forum and read until my eyes shrunk. Weighing all the info I decided to try NA because it is less invasive, doesn't require therapy, and would not preclude surgery should I ever want or need to try it.

I came back from Paris 2 weeks ago. I had sent Dr. Badois pics of my left hand, with my pinky almost 90 degrees bent. He diagnosed it is Stage III and gave me a quick appointment. After working his magic for 25/30 painfree minutes he pulled on my finger and "voila" it was straight.

I should mention that it is not as perfect looking as if I had not had a problem, it is still a bit lumpy, but the cord is broken and I can put my hand flat on a table top.

If you need more info, please feel free to email me. I am so grateful to Dr. Badois, believe Dr. Eaton here in FL is on the right path also, simply wanted a doc who had years of experience in this procedure. I was told I most likely would have a recurrence and when that happens I might go to Jupiter, FL. On second thought, Paris was absolutely fabulous, the Mona Lisa took my breath away, and the food divine. Best of luck to you and I hope you make the right decision for YOU. Traudl

02/19/04 01:10
Charlie 
02/19/04 01:10
Charlie 
Surgery

Here is a bit of information from Dr. Eaton's homepage:

"True recovery time after Dupuytren's surgery is approximately one year, making this a complicated and extended process. An average of one third of patients will ultimately develop significant contractures following surgery, from recurrence at the operative site or secondary disease elsewhere in the hand. Isolated proximal interphalangeal joint contractures, on the average, regain only half of their lost motion following surgery. No guarantee can be given regarding appearance, function or end result, and it is possible to be worse off after surgery if complications occur."

02/19/04 01:27
Charlie 
02/19/04 01:27
Charlie 
Recurrence

What is the rate of recurrence of surgery and NA?

Surgery: Dupuytren’s Contracture is a very difficult problem to treat. Five to ten years after surgery, the possibility of recurrence has been found to be as high as 50%. (www.handsurgery.org)

N.A.: The five-year recurrence rate is high (>50%) with both procedures, however, needle fasciotomy can be repeated as often as needed, whereas start again surgical procedure is hazardous. Five years results show that recurrence rate is quite comparable with surgical one, although they seem slightly earlier.(www.assoc.wanadoo.fr)



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