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getting no treatment
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10/20/04 02:50
brian 
10/20/04 02:50
brian 
getting no treatment

Not that I'm planning on doing, but I'm just curious. What would happen if someone just ignored thier DC. Would the eventual damage be so bad it would leave it untreatable? Would the fingers cripple up so bad you would lose a lot of use in your hand?

Also, I've seen on this forum where people speak of being able to get NA once a year. Is this common? Should I expect the same when I get NA? Do some people get NA and have not needed further treatment? Which is the norm?

10/20/04 02:38
Alan

not registered

10/20/04 02:38
Alan

not registered

~dq~no treatment~dq~

Brian

My little pinky had progressed to Stage IV
over the years. It was at an 185 degree angle
when I had my first NA. (IT is now 45 degrees)
At the rate it originally was contracting, that
finger would have started to grow back into the
palm requiring major surgery or amputation.
Don't want to be an alarmist though, as the
contracting process ,fortunately, is a very slow
process!

10/20/04 02:42
Paulette

not registered

10/20/04 02:42
Paulette

not registered

NA

Hello Brian, NA is a treatment procedure, it is not a cure. Perhaps some have it once and that's it..I had it done and two weeks later cords grew back and I will have again and hopefully someday the cords will grow back slower. Wish there was a survey on those of us that have it done and had a redo and in what span of time...

10/20/04 02:07
brian 
10/20/04 02:07
brian 
paulette and Alan

first thanks for both of your responses.

Paulette,
Yes, I'd be curious as to what the precentage is of those who need no further treatment and those who additional NA and how much time passed from thier first NA until more was needed. There must be some studies somewhere on this, i'd like to read them.

Alan,
I remeber when I first went to a doctor at the begining of my DC. it was a little over 4 years ago andmy pinky had not even been effect yet. I remember the doctor telling me that it will eventually have to be treated or amputation of at least one finger may be needed. I'm just wondering if NA is more relief than a treatment and although it may FEEL better the problem remains and could get worse. You know one can break his leg and be given strong enough pain medicine were he feels fine, but the break is still there and if left untreated could become crippling. I'm in no way putting down NA. I'm going to have it done at the end of November. I'm just thinking out loud.

10/20/04 02:40
paulette

not registered

10/20/04 02:40
paulette

not registered

study

I would like to know too Brian, and perhaps all of us who have had NA can do this...would be interesting to read..

10/21/04 02:22
TerryB

not registered

10/21/04 02:22
TerryB

not registered

TerryB

My DC began about ten years ago with slow growth. It accelerated about three years ago and I associate that with the time I began taking glucosomin/chondroitin (other topics on the forum support that view, even though it is not scientific). I had NA several weeks ago--I wish it had been done earlier, not only because it corrected most of the problem, but because it could have been corrected more completely before my PIP joints were involved. My Orthopedist thankfully resisted treating it surgically (before I was aware of this forum and learned about NA). NA is not a cure, as has been stated here, but neither is it just a bandaid over the problem. It is a less-invasive means of correcting--however temporarily (and that varies from person to person)--the contractures. The treatment can be repeated far more easily than surgery (my Ortho says repeat surgery is not a question of "if" but only of "when"), but Dr Eaton does advise when he no longer believes NA will suffice. Surgery is also not a cure, is far more problematic due to scar tissue and far longer recovery times, and as far as I am concerned, best left for some future time if NA is no longer effective. I pray that before that time perhaps there will be a cure for treating the problem rather than correcting the symptoms. Hope this helps.

10/21/04 02:18
brian 
10/21/04 02:18
brian 
TerryB

Although my researching NA and surgery is new and limited, from what I've concluded to this point is that NA is by far the best choice of the two. When comparing the major factors involved such as:

*noninvasive is always better than invasive
*NA is far less painful
*recovery is much faster
*less physical therapy is needed
*success is at best equal and in many cases better
*even the cost is much lower

From what I've read on this forum, researched myself and been told, NA is by far the best first treatment. Even if it's needed once a year, no big deal. I can live with that.

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