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What age are most of you? I am 36 and have it pretty bad...
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01/14/06 01:09
Marco

not registered

01/14/06 01:09
Marco

not registered

Dupuytren

Hi all,

Im 34 years old, from portugal. I had my first sirurgy when i was 20, the second i was 29, now i need a third in my left small finger and my right anelar. now i have a nodule in my left hand palm.

I realy hope anyone find a way to avoid sirgury. if any one knows a way please tell us

bye

01/15/06 01:21
Thomas 
01/15/06 01:21
Thomas 
Age

I am 46. I was diagnosed last Tuesday. I have three small nodes between my ring finger and my little finger. I have another larger node or nodes between my thumb and index finger. There seems to be a chord going from the three nodes toward the palm of my hand. I have a small amount of curvature in my little finger and have lost a some extension in my thumb. This is only in my left hand. Is there anyone in the Midwest United States who I can speak to who is knowledgeable enough to warrant speaking to, who can help with treatment options. I do a lot of detail work with my hands and awaiting surgery is not acceptable.

Thom

01/15/06 01:05
SusieQ 
01/15/06 01:05
SusieQ 
Reply toTHOMAS and MARCO

Thomas and Marco:

Both of you seem to be inquiring about alternatives to surgery.

There is definitely an alternative. It's called Needle Aponevrotomy (N.A.)

N.A. is a minimally invasive (non-surgical) outpatient procedure for Dupuytrens which effectively breaks the cords which cause contraction of the fingers, thereby releasing them. The procedure has been available in France for many years with an excellent safety record and was introduced in the U.S. in 2003 by Dr. Charles Eaton. Since then a number of other doctors have begun offering N.A. to their patients as an alternative to open hand surgery.

There is a list of M.D.s in the United States who now offer N.A. buried in a topic below. (I'll bring it to the top for your convenience)

FOR MARCO, it also lists a website which will give you contact information for doctors offering N.A. outside the U.S.

The websites on the list under the doctors' names will give you a wealth of information about Dupuytrens and N.A.

Best of luck to both of you!

Susan

01/15/06 01:48
Jerry

not registered

01/15/06 01:48
Jerry

not registered

Whatever works

are these more planted posts with advertisement answers?

01/15/06 01:29
SusieQ 
01/15/06 01:29
SusieQ 
Jerry~sq~s inquiry

Hi Jerry,

It may seem quite suspicious to you that there are so many posts here with information regarding N.A.

However, the experience many people have mentioned on this board is that when they have asked their local medical professionals about N.A. they have been totally discouraged from exploring it further, and have gotten inaccurate, misinformed responses.

My only intent (and the intent of many others on this board) is to allow people to know that N.A. exists and is a viable alternative for many Dups patients.

I believe in giving people the means to then do their own research and make up their own minds.

If you don't believe its hard for patients to get information about N.A., read Dr. Kline's website where he tells how his colleagues discouraged him from considering N.A. and how thankful he was that he didn't follow their advice!!! (http://dupuytrenscenter.com/) As a result of his own Dupuytrens disease he traveled to France, received N.A. treatment there, and studied with the French doctors, and now is one of the doctors who offers N.A. in the U.S.

What I don't understand is what motivates people who accuse people of planting posts as advertisements! Why SHOULDN'T people be given as much information as possible so they can make their own INFORMED choice???

Susan

01/16/06 01:09
Randy H.

not registered

01/16/06 01:09
Randy H.

not registered

Five Stars

Amen, Sister!

01/16/06 01:11
Larry 
01/16/06 01:11
Larry 
Information

Susie Q and all NA promoters:

I think you're right - people should have information to make their choice, but you and others on this forum are quick to shout down anyone who questions NA or dares suggest that surgery is a good option.

Seems like you're trying to have it both ways. Any reason why people who believe and/or support surgery are not given the same level of respect that you and others want for NA?

01/16/06 01:51
marjorie 
01/16/06 01:51
marjorie 
Ground Zero

Larry,
If you read the posts from the 'sensible' people you will note that we do not rule out surgery, we merely point out that it may eventually be necessary but only as a last resort. NA works and though it possibly needs repeating, maybe several times with some people, that's the point, it can be done again.
The problem with surgery is that it works well with a few people, but most people suffer severe pain following the operation and many never recover full use of their hands. If DC returns it is difficult and sometimes impossible to have further surgery due to the scar tissue which has formed.
So, we will continue to suggest that NA should always be tried first. We have been there and done it and would never have surgery if we could avoid it.
Marjorie

01/16/06 01:24
Randy H.

not registered

01/16/06 01:24
Randy H.

not registered

Ground Zero

Larry,

There are two main reasons for the NA bias you may see here.

1) NAs availability in the US is *only* as a direct result of a long list of posters to this Forum, going back to 1999. Many like myself who have had both OS and NA are passionate about seeing NA continue to gain acceptance and become mainstream. You simply don't see that kind of passion and commitment from those who still feel Open Surgery is just as valid a choice as NA as the first line of defense.

2) Outside of a handful of surgeons who have been effected by this site and are now offering NA, the vast majority of qualified professionals, who's opinions are sought out by patients on a daily basis, are *against* NA. The main voice crying in the wilderness that a new alternative to OS has come, is right here, in the form of posts like this. The high visibility and complete freedom of this Forum has given birth to the "NA Movement" and this Forum remains the main place for it's expression. Essentially, this *is* North American NA Ground Zero.

So, while NA is questioned and highly criticized in nearly *all* other quarters, it will continue to be vigorously defended here. The fruits of this are now quite evident. Believe me, when all new Dups pertinent are informed by their *own* doctors that NA may be a valid option, we will have long found better things to do.

Open Surgery *is* a good option, especially after NA has been *justifiably* ruled out, or when an individual makes a personal *informed* choice to undergo it. Unfortunately, *neither* of those two things are currently taking place in the vast majority of cases.

So, perhaps you can understand why quite a few of us are not going to back off until that happens. If you feel a vigorous discussion of the facts surrounding the various advantages/disadvantages of both NA and OS is a "shouting down", we can agree to disagree. However, the fact that a growing list of surgeons are adding NA to their practice as a *direct* result of the discussions going on here is a strong indication that what is being said has the respect of the patitents and MDs who will listen.

01/16/06 01:38
Larry #1

not registered

01/16/06 01:38
Larry #1

not registered

whoops

Just for the record, the larry on this thread is not me, I am the larry who has been posting in recent weeks as "Larry". I posted about how I used to play rugby and now have the DC, and I am a very strong supporter of NA for everyone who is a candidate.

To me, no one in their right mind would choose the open-palm surgery when a simple technique such as NA is available and possible. Choosing surgery over NA is like having a broken leg and choosing to cut it off instead of casting it.

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