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What can I expect?
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09/27/04 02:34
Tony 
09/27/04 02:34
Tony 
What can I expect?

I have just learned that Depuytren's is a problem in my father's family. I have not met my biological father but I have met two of his brothers, both of whom are sufferers and one of whom has had corrective surgery. I'm 35 and have no sign of DC as yet but I understand that it generally doesn't come on until middle age. I do have a sense of persepctive (rather than this than heart disease, for example) but I am concerned becasue I am a very keen guitarist. How is DC likely to affect this, and what kind of receovery can one expect from the fingers after surgery?
Any advice gratefully received...

09/27/04 02:57
ken 
09/27/04 02:57
ken 
Don~sq~t worry!

Tony, everybody seems to be very different with this condition. I was 46 before I noticed a problem, 5 years ago. At this stage my hand is not badly affected. I don't play guitar anymore but would not be affected if I did. Others will no doubt have different stories, but I wouldn't spend any time stressing over it until you start to show signs and then don't think about surgery.

Cheers

09/27/04 02:31
Barbara Franzkowiak

not registered

09/27/04 02:31
Barbara Franzkowiak

not registered

Dupuytrens

Tony: I had a dupuytren removed Friday Sept. 24, 2004. I had the lump in the palm of my right hand. It has only been three days and I am at work typing, there is no pain to this surgery other than the shots to deaden the hand. I had no pain in the surgery site at all. I am right handed and do not want to lose the use of my hand. I would have the surgery again if I have to.

09/27/04 02:31
Barbara Franzkowiak

not registered

09/27/04 02:31
Barbara Franzkowiak

not registered

Dupuytrens

Tony: I had a dupuytren removed Friday Sept. 24, 2004. I had the lump in the palm of my right hand. It has only been three days and I am at work typing, there is no pain to this surgery other than the shots to deaden the hand. I had no pain in the surgery site at all. I am right handed and do not want to lose the use of my hand. I would have the surgery again if I have to.

09/27/04 02:50
Peggy

not registered

09/27/04 02:50
Peggy

not registered

NA not always appropriate??

Barbara, you mention you had "surgery" Do you mean NA?? I can't imagine such a low rehab period with actual surgery. If you do mean NA, who did you go to? Dr. Eaton??

09/27/04 02:17
ken 
09/27/04 02:17
ken 
NA not always appropriate??

I have been advised by a surgeon that the NA procedure is not appropriate where the DC nodules are attached to the palm (as mine is). If it not attached then the NA is more effective.

Has anybody else had experience with this?

09/27/04 02:44
Randy H.

not registered

09/27/04 02:44
Randy H.

not registered

Before and After

First, I'm sure your surgeon means well, but frankly, what does he know about NA? He has neither seen it done, much less done it himself. If he had, we would all know about it. My guess is that what he knows about NA he has learned from other surgeons, which at this point in time is unfortunately a very poor source of information.

A better word than "appropriate" would be "effective". NA is *not* effective when the cord(s) are not pronounced (diffused) and not easily found by the inserted needle. However, the issue of how long or how far the cord(s) travel into the palm has no bearing on NA's effectiveness. See the before and after pictures in Eaton's sight and you'll see what I mean. The "before" shots show the blue dots where Eaton intends to sever the cord(s). There are certainly blue dots in the palms.

http://www.e-hand.com/needledup/index.htm

If you have NA done, be sure and send your doc the "after" pictures and a picture of you tightly gripping a golf club or something abut a week after the procedure:) I'm sure he'll enjoy seeing that. (You get to skip the hand therapy)

09/27/04 02:31
jim 
09/27/04 02:31
jim 
Likelihood?

A couple of years ago when I had 2 rapdidly progressing PIP joint contractures I emailed Dr. Badois in Paris, sending him digital photos. He replied that success with NA might be limited because of the degree to which the contractures were attached to the surrounding tissue. As a result I went ahead with conventional surgery which was fairly successul - I've had no recurrence in those areas, but the pinky was pretty well frozen at 45 degrees within a year of the surgery.

So yes, the degree to which the DD tissue is bound to the surrounding tissue varies and yes, this limits the effectiveness of NA. But if I had to do it again, I think I'd try NA first.

09/28/04 02:12
Tony 
09/28/04 02:12
Tony 
Likelihood?

I have two biological uncles both with DC, they are from 11 siblings. One of the uncles has children in their 40s who are hsowing no signs, yet at least. They don't know if my biological father has it or not as he hasn't been seen in years (that's a whole other story). What is the *likelihood* of it being passed on? If, as is likely, my father has it, is it a dead cert that I will have it? Or is it possible that it won't be passed on to me even if he does have it?

09/29/04 02:10
Eddie 
09/29/04 02:10
Eddie 
No use worrying

Tony,

That is an easy one to answer :
The one certainty about DP (development, passing-on etc), is that there is no certainty.
Statistics ? Well, we are not statistics, we are humans.
Worrying ? Remember, don't worry, be happy.
If there is a bridge to cross, wait until you get there.

Eddie

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