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Collaganase injection treatment
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04/11/08 09:29
batman

not registered

04/11/08 09:29
batman

not registered

Collaganase injection treatment

Any one know why you can't have some form of anesetic, or perhaps even hypnosis when the consultant snaps the cord following the injection, as the proceedure, I found to be extremely painfull.

batman

04/11/08 10:26
wach 

Administrator

04/11/08 10:26
wach 

Administrator

Re: Collaganase injection treatment

NA is a "blind" procedure, the doctor does not see into what he is stitching. He therefore wants/requires feedback from the patient whether his needle is approaching a nerve. It may be similar with collagenase. But I also heard that the this is only for the trail. Afterwards an additional, pain reducing medication is possible or will even be the standard.

Wolfgang

Edited at 04/11/08 10:29

04/12/08 10:44
batman

not registered

04/12/08 10:44
batman

not registered

Re: Collaganase injection treatment

Wolfgang
Although I have no knowledge of the N/A treatment for Dupuytren's, I can see what you're saying with regards to the doctor " needing feedback if approaching a nerve with the needle" while stitching the cord.

However as you know with the Collaganase treatment the Doctor injects the Collaganase into your finger to weaken the cord and although this is slightly uncomfortable, the next day when He physically snaps the cord, I found to be extremely painfull and although I personally feel that the Collaganase injection treatment is far better than open surgery with much quicker results, some form of anesetic should be administered when snapping the cord !!!!.
P.S.
by the way I have just undergone second treatment for another finger and on this occasion knowing what to expect, I took 2 x500mg paracetamol pain-killers prior to the Doctor snapping the cord, which although I think helped when the secondary pain kicked in, did nothing to alleviate the pain while the snapping took place.
Perhaps I am just a wimp with extremely low pain thresh-hold and stand alone in the issue of pain involved !!!!!!!

Batman

04/12/08 11:08
Wolfgang

not registered

04/12/08 11:08
Wolfgang

not registered

Re: Collaganase injection treatment

Hi Batman, I am sure you are not a whimp! Snapping the cord is always inconvenient and I am confident that a pain reliever will be applied in the future before snapping, once collagenase has become a standard procedure. In that respect you might have been unlucky being a trial patient but you got the treatment earlier and won time. That's great! The pain will be forgotten soon and your finger will still be straight.

Wolfgang

04/13/08 10:15
batman

not registered

04/13/08 10:15
batman

not registered

Re: Collaganase injection treatment

Hi wolfgang
I aggree totally with your words of wisdom regarding pain involved and as you say "it is soon forgotten" or may'be put in the back of your memory, as the benefits of the teatment far outway the downside and yes I do consider myself to be very fortunate to be undergoing the clinical research trials here in U.K.
If I had not been chosen for the trials, the first finger I had injected in March was listed for surgery and as this finger had already twice undergone surgery over the last four years and the skin stretched to such a degree that a skin graft would have been neccessary and I believe it would have taken months to have full use of the hand.
Where as having the Collaganase treatment the finger was straightened within days and I had full and normal use of my hand within.a week. How good is that!!!!

Batman

05/09/08 19:50
jim_h 
05/09/08 19:50
jim_h 
Re: Collaganase injection treatment

batman, I'm guess it's partly a cost issue - Auxilium isn't paying for any anesthetic or hypnosis as part of the trial. And, they probably want to find out how much it hurts.

05/29/08 19:58
HandMan

not registered

05/29/08 19:58
HandMan

not registered

Re: Collaganase injection treatment

I have heard that a few patients have had their tendons rupture after injection with this medication. I was wondering if anyone else has heard of this and how many patients it has happened to?

05/29/08 19:59
HandMan

not registered

05/29/08 19:59
HandMan

not registered

Re: Collaganase injection treatment

I have heard that a few patients have had their tendons rupture after injection with this medication. I was wondering if anyone else has heard of this and how many patients it has happened to?

07/05/08 18:52
bstenman 
07/05/08 18:52
bstenman 
Re: Collaganase injection treatment

I suspect that the treatment was administered in the USA where the medical community and our society has a medieval attitude toward pain and pain management. I had throat surgery and was told by a retire doctor and former head of surgery at Walter Reed (USA military hospital) that pain actually inhibited the healing functions of the body and he believed most medical practitioners under proscribed pain killers.

I don't know the process but someone does need to confront the medical people involved and get them to change their procedure to include providing proper pain medication. Their cavalier attitude toward pain and the clinical trial volunteers needs to be challenged.

Bruce

07/19/08 00:50
bshatzer 
07/19/08 00:50
bshatzer 
Re: Collaganase injection treatment

Dunno - I went through an "open label" trial and the first two times to attempt to snap the cord were "naked" - no anesthetics. The third try, the physician used a local anesthetic to deaden the hand.

Given my choice, I'd take the local anesthetic every time - without it, it's like something they'd use at Guantanamo, with it, its uncomfortable but nothing more. Apparently there's no medical reason not to use the anesthetic. Ask for it. Nay, demand it.

'Cording the the physician, they changed the protocols halfway through my trial to allow the use of the local. As he opined, "we're all learning, even we physicians".

Bill

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Collaganase   treatment   collagenase   uncomfortable   practitioners   snapping   straightened   anesthetic   pain-killers   surgery   inconvenient   procedure   medication   Although   thresh-hold   Wolfgang   approaching   injection   administered   patients