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don~sq~t touch that foot
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09/27/02 02:07
ken nechvatal

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09/27/02 02:07
ken nechvatal

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don~sq~t touch that foot

this is a great board. i never knew so many people have DC like me. about 5 yrs now. started at 40 yrs old. both hands. anyway, i had what started out as a lump smaller than a marble located in the arch of my right foot. it didn't bother me too much but everyone who saw it said get rid of it so i did. wish i didn't now. last time i looked the re-occuring lump is slightly smaller than a golf ball! i would have it removed but will it grow back even larger? my advice to anyone is that unless it is painful or it limits your day to day activity leave it alone! the arch is a very sensitive area. it took me quite a while to get over the sugury and get my foot back to normal only to have it come back with a vengence. now my pinkie on my right hand is at 45 degrees and very painful so i am contemplating getting it fixed. i hope it turns out better than my foot. any last minute advice? how long is too long to wait?. thanks. kenny

09/27/02 02:44
Gary Evans

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09/27/02 02:44
Gary Evans

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don~sq~t touch that foot

Kenny,
I think you have experienced what the general concensus is on the forum, that is: Leave the feet alone until absolutely no choice.
You will read the different ideas for what you should do with your little finger on this forum. Different people have different ideas depending on their success. I had surgery (fasciectomy, zig-zag, 90 degrees) and had a complete success and would do it again. Others will suggest something else such as needle apronevroty which is not done in the U.S. or Canada for some reason yet to be determined. If you can wait for 2 or 3 years there seems (at this point) to be a promising injection called Cordase which may or may not happen. Don't wait too long (not more than 75 degrees approx.). By waiting too long you might eliminate some procedures. Then there is the alternative of doing nothing and eventually facing amputation.
It will be your choice, so learn all you can and ask questions.
Good luck,
Gary

09/27/02 02:00
Bill

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09/27/02 02:00
Bill

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NA

Kenny, I suggest you check out the web pages and postings here dealing with NA. You'll find much good information and read testimonials from people who have had great results, without the many risks involved with the surgery done here. Some here are violently opposed to any treatment not sanctioned by the AMA and try to make alternatives look bad by nothing more than hearsay and rumor. Be cautious and aggressive reviewing treatment options and remember that the longer you wait, the fewer choices you'll have.

09/27/02 02:37
Gary Evans

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09/27/02 02:37
Gary Evans

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don~sq~t touch that foot

Jill,
How does Kenny find Dr. Rappoport in Switzerland? And is that who you would suggest he see?
Gary

10/02/02 02:25
kenny

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10/02/02 02:25
kenny

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Foot surgery success on one foot

I sure wish this forum was here back then and i could have the marble back instead of the golfball. Yes, leave sleeping dogs lay. My advice is to research and only have anything done if you absolutely need it. I have decided to have my finger done because it hurts and it is getting in the way. I am confident that it is the right time to do it and all will go well and reading this forum helped me with my decision. I got more info here than i did from any doctor.

10/13/02 02:48
neffann

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10/13/02 02:48
neffann

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Foot surgery success on one foot

Fibromatosis does not normally occur beneath the second toe area. However I got it in both my feet.

I had Dupuytren's surgery in my right dominate hand last year, and the disease shown itself in both second toe areas in a matter of two weeks after surgery.

I'm grateful of the first surgery done on my left foot in the following year -- the tumor was tripping me, and making me slow down to a 40-minute-mile crawl in walking. The results is that I do have internal scar tissue and tenderness to contend, but it beats all stuffing out of what it was. I can now walk again like a normal person.

In a matter of 10 months from that first tumor removal, I'm going to undergo the second tumor removal, for it is painful to walk on that tumor the first thing in the morning. (In November 2002)

Yes, it does occur underneath the second toe, and yes, in women in their early 40's.

10/17/02 02:58
JERRY 
10/17/02 02:58
JERRY 
Please describe the lump

I noticed that you were not provided with the Doctors full address, therefore it follows:

Dr. G. Rappoport
Centre Thermal
1400 Av de Bain
Yverdon, Switzerland
+00 (024) 23 .02.02

grappoport@vtxnet.ch


10/17/02 02:56
JM

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10/17/02 02:56
JM

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Please describe the lump

Will someone please describe what the lump is like? Is it like a corn, with hardened skin around it? Thanks for answering.

10/18/02 02:44
neffann

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10/18/02 02:44
neffann

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JM - what is the disease like for Ledderhose

JM,

In my case, it was very sudden tenderness, with a small lump in my left foot right underneath the second toe (called the hammerhead area). The lump grew into a big puffy golfball tumor on my left foot within the 9 months. My foot surgeon at examination thought it was a tendon tumor. Also, the surgeon had detected the other lump, same area in my right foot. And, when the surgeon handled the lump in my right foot, it was extremely "ouchy." Pathology reports came back as fibromatosis in my left foot.
That's my story, and my feet are steppin' on it!
Neffann

10/18/02 02:50
neffann

not registered

10/18/02 02:50
neffann

not registered

Correction

The area beneath the second toe is called the metahead area.

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