| Lost password
419 users onlineYou are not loggend in.  Login
Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.
 1 .. 3 4 5 6 7 .. 9
 1 .. 3 4 5 6 7 .. 9
01/10/2008 19:09
bshatzer 
01/10/2008 19:09
bshatzer 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

For GPM: I think I've just been unlucky. There are 14 folks in my particular trial - 'cording to the nurse, only myself and one other required more than one set of injections and I'm the only one who's currently scheduled for a third set. I went into this thinking I'd have only a couple reports and then could report complete success and end this particular thread on an up note. It didn't work out that way but it seems to be much more successful with other folks. Scheduled for my third and final round next week - hopefully that'll do it but if not, well, then, this is my contribution to medical science. No treatment is 100% effective and you need the negatives as well as the positive to adequately assess the effectiveness of the treatment.

For Jocond: I'm in Portland Oregon.

Wish me better luck for monday!

01/11/2008 04:39
moondanc 
01/11/2008 04:39
moondanc 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

to bshatzer:

having gotten the injections, I really do wish you good luck. Have you considered being really careful with your hand after the injections and trying to keep it as stable and unmoving -- for up to 2 days--as possible so the Xiaflex doesn't migrate away from the cord?

I had my 30 day return visit this week and as I suspexcted weas pronounced a "success' because my finger straightened. That's the defining criteria of the study. I think what happened is my 'cord' "snapped' --as they say in trial lingo-- (tore is more what it felt like) which released my finger. However, despite the assurances of the study doc, there has been little to no change in my palm and the skin remains tether in 3-4 places and also at the very base of my finger. I can still feel the hard lumps and strings of the cord. I'm going to wait a month or so to see if it gets any better and then see what my alternatives are-- either another NA (my last was in 2005) or perhaps Kenalog injections.

01/11/2008 15:14
jim_h 
01/11/2008 15:14
jim_h 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

All that stuff - cords and lumps - will remain in your hand. All Xiaflex does, or is supposed to do, is weaken the cord in one spot, so that it can be snapped. You still have the disease, and it is still active. So yes, from what you're saying I think you're a success.

01/13/2008 04:51
moondanc 
01/13/2008 04:51
moondanc 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

Jim H.

I'm not sure you are entirely correct. I know that Xiaflex doesn't "cure" the disease. However, Biospecifics claimed it "dissolves" collagen. My study doc all but assured me at my 7 day checkup that the skin tethering would disappear. At my 28 day check up he advised me to keep rubbing my palm (part of the clinical trial involves rubbing what they call "Vitamin E cream" into the palm. It's not really Vitamin E cream but an inexpensive hand lotion --Suave-- containing some Vitamin E.) However, I've gotten many mixed and conflicting messages in the study. I also know that collagenase can't perfectly "attack" or dissolve the entire cord. However, collagenase treatment isn't that attractive to me if I have to undergo NA after to release the skin tethering.

Jim H said:
All that stuff - cords and lumps - will remain in your hand. All Xiaflex does, or is supposed to do, is weaken the cord in one spot, so that it can be snapped. You still have the disease, and it is still active. So yes, from what you're saying I think you're a success.

01/13/2008 16:31
Joe 
01/13/2008 16:31
Joe 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

After reading some comments on this topic, but only having had Kenalog injection twice, I have a few comments.

The injection of unbuffered Lidocaine, while a sharp sting, is not too bad and certainly tolerable. My next Kenalog injection will be with buffered Lidocaine and I will report. I would suggest requesting, when allowed, Lidocaine in the palm closer to the wrist and waiting about 15 minutes. You will then not feel anything from that point to the tip of your fingers which are in line with the Lidocaine injection location.

Lidocaine for breaking the cords could be a problem as the doctor could over do it without your feedback. Personally, I would rather do it than someone else as the feedback loop would be much shorter.

I have to agree with Wanker, all patients should e-mail, or publish a web page as I have, (http://kineoptics.com/stuff.html), pictures to their doctor to contribute to the data.

After reading all the reports on Auxilium AA4500, I have to agree with a few in that the procedure seems to be more of a "chemical NA". The standard NA procedure appears to have less pain and swelling. Could it be that Auxilium AA4500 injections require less skill and technique than NA and thus more attractive? Unless there is much less recurring with Auxilium AA4500, I'd opt for NA when it becomes necessary in my hand.


01/13/2008 17:52
wach 

Administrator

01/13/2008 17:52
wach 

Administrator

Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

Joe, Wanker, and everyone else who has editorial access to a web site: we need your help to improve our web site ranking. It would really be great if you could add a link to www.dupuytren-online.info and/or to our forum somewhere on your web site.

Thanks a lot to all of you!

Wolfgang

Quote:




I have to agree with Wanker, all patients should e-mail, or publish a web page as I have, (http://kineoptics.com/stuff.html), pictures to their doctor to contribute to the data.


01/13/2008 18:23
Joe 
01/13/2008 18:23
Joe 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

Wolfgang, I have a link at the top of the page. Is it done correctly?

http://www.kineoptics.com/stuff.html

01/13/2008 20:32
wach 

Administrator

01/13/2008 20:32
wach 

Administrator

Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

Perfect! Thank you!!

Quote:



Wolfgang, I have a link at the top of the page. Is it done correctly?

http://www.kineoptics.com/stuff.html



01/14/2008 02:28
moondanc 
01/14/2008 02:28
moondanc 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.



The reason Xiaflex (used in the Auxilium trials) is supposedly better is because unlike surgery and NA there is no scar tissue left behind to complicate further/repeated procedures. Another "possible" reason is longer times before reocccurence but I don't think there's enough data to support this yet. Finally, although I've heard conflicting numbers for the cost of Xiaflex-- anywhere from $1000- to $5000 per-- it seems to be a real money maker for MDs and as you say requires much less skill.

Joe said:

After reading all the reports on Auxilium AA4500, I have to agree with a few in that the procedure seems to be more of a "chemical NA". The standard NA procedure appears to have less pain and swelling. Could it be that Auxilium AA4500 injections require less skill and technique than NA and thus more attractive? Unless there is much less recurring with Auxilium AA4500, I'd opt for NA when it becomes necessary in my hand.



01/14/2008 02:37
moondanc 
01/14/2008 02:37
moondanc 
Re: Auxilium AA4500 Trials Report.

Lidocaine was actually used successfully in the earlier trials-- IIB. I'm not sure why it was discontinued. I have PDFs for the Journal of Hand Surgery 2002 article on the Stage II trials with full statistics and the Jrnl of Hand Surgery July -August 2007 report on Stage III trials. However, they're too long to post. Is anyone interested in these or can you suggest how I might post them?

Joe said:

Lidocaine for breaking the cords could be a problem as the doctor could over do it without your feedback. Personally, I would rather do it than someone else as the feedback loop would be much shorter.





 1 .. 3 4 5 6 7 .. 9
 1 .. 3 4 5 6 7 .. 9
straight   degrees   Auxilium   swelling   fingers   collagenase   patients   injection   probably   recurrence   improvement   Collegenase   Wolfgang   treatment   injections   Surgery   because   contraction   procedure   dupuytren-online