Works for me (4 | Forum Archive 1 | Forum for Dupuytren's contracture

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Works for me
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10.01.04 01:57
John

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10.01.04 01:57
John

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Anyone have any more info on this?

I wish to try it.

15.01.04 01:50
Anon

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15.01.04 01:50
Anon

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Lecithin

Here are the posts about it.

15.01.04 01:04
Anon

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15.01.04 01:04
Anon

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Lecithin and Insulin

Google them together...they fit our friends theory about insulin as the underlying factor in DC.

15.01.04 01:19
Anon

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15.01.04 01:19
Anon

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More ...

Googling 'Lecithin and Diabetes' and
'lethicin and Insulin'

Both results are interesting....now I would not want anyone to think this is a final answer. Talk to your doctors about the possibility having diabetes or pre-diabetes...if you find out this may be your problem...ask the md what to do...research the different associations....learn....don't take info on this website as the definitive answer...make sure your md supervises anything you do....there's still a lot to learn.

Having said that....it give me a warm & fuzzy feeling to see how the theory that has been presented under www.dupuytrens-a-new-theory.com does seem to cross paths with the Lecithin information that has also been presented.

Damn good work guys!

Anon

30.01.04 01:24
John

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30.01.04 01:24
John

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Lecithin & Diabetes

Interesting information on the possibility of an insulin connection.

To respond to Mary Beth. I am still taking the lecithin granules and they still seem to be extremely helpful. I tried the liquid lecithin, but (possibly my imagination) it did not seem to work as well. I was told that the granules get into the blood stream more efficiently.

07.02.04 01:50
pablo

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07.02.04 01:50
pablo

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Lecithin granules vs liquid

Regarding the discussion about lecithin liquid vs granules, as a chemist, I've worked with this stuff for years.

The primary difference is that the liquid contains about 30% soybean oil. So the granules have more active ingredient by weight (they are about the same by volume). Which you use is primarily a matter of preference and whether you want the small amount of extra oil.

When cooking with these, you can add the liquid directly to baked good recipes, where with the granules, you need to dissolve them in as small amount of warm liquid first.

26.02.04 01:36
Anon

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26.02.04 01:36
Anon

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Lecithin

Husband has been using Lecithin Granuels (3 heaping table spoons) for 5 weeks and has noticed a *minor* change. He says that for the last week, when he stretches his fingers in the morning, they feel *slightly* looser, and there is a deep bruised feeling instead of pain. I had told him not to expect to feel any difference until the three month mark, if there was going to be a difference at all....so this is better then we expected. :-)

Hubby's DC is not severe so I don't know if Lecithin would work for all people.

Anon.
Good luck.

06.03.04 01:26
Jason 
06.03.04 01:26
Jason 
granules vs. gel tablets

I pulled the following info off this website: http://www.nutriteam.com/lecithin.htm

I was diagnosed with a DC nodule in my left hand and perhaps some early stage thickening in my right. I am a rockclimber and can't imagine giving up that life, so I'm pushing heavily on my lecithin intake and using a Vitamin E hand lotion. Hopefully it will help keep me from developing DC any further. From the looks of it, the granules are significantly more concentrated way to deliver lecithin. Feel free to email me if you would like to discuss your experiences or have any questions.

Q. What forms of lecithin are available?
A. There are two basic forms: granules and soft gel capsules. Granules are a pleasant-tasting, concentrated way to supplement. (Granules contain 23% phosphatidylcholine.) One tablespoon of lecithin granules contains about 250 mg of choline, about half the daily recommended intake for men and women. Lecithin capsules vary in concentration, but a typical 1,200 mg capsule has only 24 mg of choline, about 5% of the recommended daily intake.


Q. What's the difference between capsules and granules?
A. Let's compare the number of 'servings' of capsules to one tablespoon of lecithin granules. One tablespoon granules is equivalent to 10 capsules of regular-strength 1,200 mg lecithin capsules, four triple-strength 1,200 mg caps, or 12 400 mg triple-strength caps. These are the most common forms available.


Q. How do I take lecithin granules?
A. This is the good part: lecithin granules have a very pleasant, nutty taste. They can be added to beverages, sprinkled on granola, cottage cheese or yogurt, mixed into salads or fruits, or just eat them by the spoonful.

Good luck folks,
Jason

07.03.04 01:47
Anon

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07.03.04 01:47
Anon

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What~sq~s your dose again?

How many tablespoons to you take and what is your weight?

08.03.04 01:59
Jason 
08.03.04 01:59
Jason 
granules vs. gel tablets

I am currently trying to get 3 tablespoons per day. I weight 160 pounds.

A few ways to eat it that I've found:

1. Blended into a smoothie.
2. Mixed into a yogurt.
3. In my cereal.
4. Mixed into baked cookies.
5. Stirred into a glass of milk.

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