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Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?
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03/22/2011 17:06
bill_c 
03/22/2011 17:06
bill_c 
Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

Here are a couple of my questions that I figured I'd throw out to the forum:

- Is it worth it to give up alcohol? I drank a lot in my 20's (I'm 40 now and just diagnosed) but now drink an average of maybe 1 1/2 glasses of red wine daily. In the past 10 years, my body has been reacting much more strongly to overdrinking, particularly beer. If I drink 4 beers with friends, I will be sick until 5 pm the next day. Are there other Dupuytren's sufferers with a similar experience? I wonder if there is some sort of inflammatory response in the immune system for some of us that is related to alcohol. Has anyone experienced good results from giving up alcohol?

- What about caffeine? I love my daily espresso but I can make it decaf if there is some inflammatory link to Dupuytren's. However, from what I've read online, there's no diet that has been proven to slow the progression of the disease. I don't want to give up my caffeine on pure speculation alone. Has anyone experienced success with giving up caffeine?

- Same questions above about sugar and general lifestyle changes. I'm willing to be strict about an anti-inflammatory diet but I don't want to completely deprive myself if there's no benefit. I already eat healthy but I do participate in the occasional candy/soda/cookie/burger-munching session.

I would love to hear individual thoughts, particularly if there's anyone who's experienced any measurable success in changing their lifestyle.

Edited 03/22/11 19:55

03/22/2011 20:45
philwaite 
03/22/2011 20:45
philwaite 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

Try putting the word 'alcohol' in the search engine to see all earlier postings on the forum.
Good luck with the enquiries.

03/23/2011 00:26
David26

not registered

03/23/2011 00:26
David26

not registered

Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

My two cents. Food and drink choices make no difference with DD. I tried a strict anti-inflammatory diet for 8 months. Also took some beneficial supplements (tumeric, mushroom extracts, etc.) My DD continued to progress, no difference noted at all. I've also read a number of articles and opinions on it. I think the majority believes as I do. I enjoy a beer or drink in moderation. Same with coffee. A good burger is hard to beat.

I have always eaten pretty healthy though. I think you are fine to continue doing those things, especially since they are enjoyable to you.

03/23/2011 04:59
LubaM. 
03/23/2011 04:59
LubaM. 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

In my opinion, I think that 1 1/2 glass of red wine daily, a cup of expresso per day, or the occasional candy/soda/cookie/burger-munching session would not precipitate the disease. I have been following this forum
for many years and there has been much discussion on the subject of food, alcohol and genetics in relation with this
disease.

I have Dupuytren and Ledderhose. I never drink wine or alcohol, have no older relatives with Dupuytren, and have no Viking ancestry.... Go figure !

Edited 03/23/11 06:59

03/24/2011 13:21
marjorieb 
03/24/2011 13:21
marjorieb 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

Thanks for this thread! I tried searching the forum and gleaning tidbits on this same subject. So much information, I just felt uncertain. Hopefully others will respond to this, if something has worked for them.
Being a coffee drinker, I have wondered about the caffiene issue. Also wondered if that once in a couple of months Heffeweissen would cause me to wake up with contractures.
I'm with you Luba. Aside from German ancestry and one distant relative with DD, I don't fit the profile. I thnk lots of others would say the same.
Beth

03/24/2011 14:04
lori 
03/24/2011 14:04
lori 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

My grandmother and aunt had DD and both did not drink. They did drink coffee. I drink both coffee and have a glass of wine several nights a week. I don't fit the profile since I am female and developed DD at age 53. Who knows, maybe we are the new profile, or the new profile is there is no profile???

Lori

03/24/2011 14:28
Maddie 
03/24/2011 14:28
Maddie 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

I'm in the same boat. When I met with Dr. Seegenschmiedt last week, he summarized my situation as "no family history, no risk factors." When I asked then why do I have such an aggressive case of DD, he just said that sometimes that happens. I am of Northern European descent, though (German, English, and French).

Also, I eat a pretty healthy diet and do not drink or smoke. Plus, after my diagnosis in Jan. 2010, I went on a pretty strict anti-inflammatory diet which I am still on. I love the diet -- I lost more than 15 pounds and I feel better generally. But it hasn't helped the DD as far as I can see, as I had a recurrence in the past few months a year after receiving RT.

I do drink a fair amount of black tea. I don't know if that's a problem. I do know that I'd need some pretty good evidence before I'd be willing to give that up. Since I don't drink alcohol or sodas or eat sugar, I'm hanging on to my tea as long as I can!

Maddie

Edited 03/24/11 16:31

03/24/2011 15:38
bill_c 
03/24/2011 15:38
bill_c 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

Thanks everyone for your responses! I found a lot of threads on lifestyle changes but none that seemed all that current. Your responses are very informative to me.

I'm wondering if maybe you all can help me with one more issue. Since figuring out that I have DD, I have had a lot of sleepless nights. I keep imagining how horrible this thing is going to be but I think the fear of it is probably worse than the actuality. I drive to work each day past a cancer center and it reminds me that there are far worse afflictions. But each night, I wake up with fear about not being able to play baseball with my son or fear about not being able to type at work (I'm a programmer). How do each of you mentally process this disease and deal with it in your everyday lives?

03/24/2011 17:03
marjorieb 
03/24/2011 17:03
marjorieb 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

bill_c:
I'm wondering if maybe you all can help me with one more issue. Since figuring out that I have DD, I have had a lot of sleepless nights. I keep imagining how horrible this thing is going to be but I think the fear of it is probably worse than the actuality. I drive to work each day past a cancer center and it reminds me that there are far worse afflictions. But each night, I wake up with fear about not being able to play baseball with my son or fear about not being able to type at work (I'm a programmer). How do each of you mentally process this disease and deal with it in your everyday lives?

bill_c,

I didn't see a message stating when you were diagnosed. For me, the first 3-4 weeks were very stressful. It has been 8 weeks, now, and I don't worry much anymore.
Reading stories and advice on this forum has really helped me to focus more on a solution and what I CAN Do, rather that what I CAN'T Do.
Also, as with any diseaase process, stress only increases discomfort. So, try to relax. Easier said than done, but very important.
I used to work as a Certified Hand Therapist. At the time, Xiaflex was not in use. Surgery was pretty much the only option. I saw pre and post-op patients who had severe cases of DD. I was amazed at how postive they were and how little they let DD effect their lives. Reflecting on those folks helps me.
Hopefully reading some of the personal stories on this forum will help you.

Wishing you well,
Beth

03/24/2011 17:32
bill_c 
03/24/2011 17:32
bill_c 
Re: Lifestyle changes. Any success stories?

Thanks for the response, Beth. I was diagnosed earlier this week, although I've known that I have DD for a couple of weeks now. In some ways, not knowing how it will affect my life is the most disturbing part. I have read a lot of stories here. I've even seen stories from people who have lost fingers who have just moved on with their lives. You may be right - this disease is still so new to me and I'm just processing what it means at this point. I'm assuming I'll calm down in time.

As far as focusing on what I can do for DD, I am spending a lot of time on the phone with my health provider, my GP's office and the office where I want to do RT. The medical system is quite frustrating when you want to move quickly. My Father-in-law just passed away this last January from cancer in his chest. From the time that they began suspecting cancer to the time that he first received treatment, it took about 4 months. That's too much precious time, in my humble opinion. I want things to move more quickly, darn it!

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