| Lost password
180 users onlineYou are not loggend in.  Login
diet and dupuytrens
 1 2
 1 2
06/10/15 23:40
BRIANB 
06/10/15 23:40
BRIANB 
Re: diet and dupuytrens

Appreciate your suggestions etc...you mention stress-anxiety ..we all have that ...just a part of life..although my level of stress I would rate rather low ...comfortably retired ...low blood pressure ..110 / 60 ..happily married..two very successful adult children ... life is good ...just do not cut or break your finger / arm ..and avoid vibrations..

06/11/15 02:34
Pedro 
06/11/15 02:34
Pedro 
Re: diet and dupuytrens

You are most welcome, if it helps you and you report back, that will suffice as my gratification.

Good to know your life is good and you rate your stress levels as rather low, hopefully that is one possible concern you may have put to bed.

While your baseline might be considered near normal, this does not necessarily mean that blood circulation is not restricted in your hands or elsewhere.

If I recall rightly, Vibrations - which you mention as causing or agravating your condition - are one possible cause of Raynaud's, a condition that temporarily limits blood supply and over time causes the small arteries in the hands and/or feet to thicken slightly, further limiting blood flow - so happens that prior to Dupuytrens, I suffered from Raynaud's too.

All said, it really is up to you to understand the condition you suffer from and/or ways that you either treat or live with it, not forgetting that there could be other underlying conditions.

I am no medical practitioner and have done as much as any layman can do by supplying you with a remedy that has and continues to assist me - and I believe is possibly beneficial to you and other D.D. and maybe even Ledderhose sufferers - the ball is back in your court - I really have nothing to gain by pushing it on you and wish you the best in however you choose to, or not, in dealing with the condition.

Edited 06/11/15 02:41

03/19/19 00:46
_Ricko_ 
03/19/19 00:46
_Ricko_ 
Re: diet and dupuytrens - mineral deficiencies, etc.

Hi all,

I was browsing re DD and saw the mention of Reynauds too. I have a touch of DD and Reynauds, CVD... and a calcium score of 563 (zero is the best you can do. Over 400 is something to be concerned about)
I've seen magnesium suggested anecdotally as a way to treat DD. I've read something about calcium may be a cause of the nodules, and I've done a ton of reading on calcium problems, hardening of the arteries (CVD), PAD, AMD, Alzheimers, etc. With all of that, there seems to be a "calcium behaving badly" commonality there (sure, I could be wrong, but I'll bet I'm not). I'm digress, but hear me out.

The Dutch at Maastricht U have been doing trials addressing bone/arterial issues with vitamin K2. They test before and after arterial flexibility. They can't cut the participants open to see their arteries, but they did with a bunch of rats, and they showed reduced calcification by giving them K2.

You might want to start googling different combinations of "dupuytren's, calcium, magnesium, K2, TNF" etc to see what turns up. You might be surprised.

Agribusiness, corn-feeding all animals, etc, has probably depleted a lot of the nutrients that used to be in food. And then there is a lot of sugar added to processed foods to make it addictive.
Some think sugar is a cause of CVD (and therefore PAD, Reynauds ... and ?) rather than cholesterol.
Then there are vegan proponents that say they can cure CVD via vegan diets - whole grain carbs (slow release sugar) and veggies are good, fat bad.
Then there are the Weston Price folks' "activator X". They don't denigrate plant nor animal, just western, processed food.

I've concluded that processed foods aren't any good, that cutting back on meat (not eliminating, but seeking out wild-caught and grass fed animals) is good (they eat green grass/kelp, and the chloroplasts in the plants contain K1), and that dark leafy greens are the best (hint: they contain a ton of K1, which converts to K2-M4, which is involved in transporting calcium out of soft tissues (artery walls) and into bones. In other words, moving calcium to where it belongs. Maybe this pertains to DD, with some magnesium too, of course!

Anyway, that's the road I started down 1 year ago (med diet, vitamin Bs,C,D3,E, K2, magnesium, turmeric, ginger root pills), I'm not turning back, and I'm not dead yet.*
Just my 2 cents, FWIW. Thank you for hearing me out.
--
Rick

* My PCP is a "statin man". We don't see eye to eye on this at all. He called me a walking heart attack in front of his staff.
I did not call him a f___g idiot, but based on the studies I've read (which he adamantly refused to read) I've concluded he is.

Edited 03/19/19 00:50

 1 2
 1 2
calcium   gratification   contributory   diabetes   condition   underlying   post-doctoral   nutrition   stress-anxiety   dupuytrens   understanding   self-experimenter   investigating   commonalities   DUPUYTREN   anti-inflammatory   Circulation   inflammation   calcification   possible