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Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London
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07/03/2010 21:03
flojo 
07/03/2010 21:03
flojo 
Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

Viking,
How about NA for your contracture?

07/05/2010 16:53
Larry 
07/05/2010 16:53
Larry 
Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

viking:
Many thanks to all that replied . I am in the UK so sounds like I will have to tell the GP what needs doing . I hope that the NHS will give my hand a blast. I would like to get a few more years use before operations. My father has had operations on both hands and it lasted all of a year so I guess that is just the way it is:


Do they have experienced docs to examine your hands and choose the right machine and technique to treat.
I would doubt that anyone in UK has sufficient experience to treat DD properly - I personally went to Germany
and was well treated there ...

07/12/2010 20:46
TrevB 
07/12/2010 20:46
TrevB 

Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

Larry:
viking:
Many thanks to all that replied . I am in the UK so sounds like I will have to tell the GP what needs doing . I hope that the NHS will give my hand a blast. I would like to get a few more years use before operations. My father has had operations on both hands and it lasted all of a year so I guess that is just the way it is:


Do they have experienced docs to examine your hands and choose the right machine and technique to treat.
I would doubt that anyone in UK has sufficient experience to treat DD properly - I personally went to Germany
and was well treated there ...

I don't think that it's rocket science for an competent consultant and UK equipment is more than adequate.

I actually asked why I was not given lead screening like the German example shown on this website

Cambidgeshire, UK.

Edited 07/12/10 23:47

07/12/2010 22:02
PhilipHa1 
07/12/2010 22:02
PhilipHa1 
Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

TrevB:
Larry:
viking:
Many thanks to all that replied . I am in the UK so sounds like I will have to tell the GP what needs doing . I hope that the NHS will give my hand a blast. I would like to get a few more years use before operations. My father has had operations on both hands and it lasted all of a year so I guess that is just the way it is:


Do they have experienced docs to examine your hands and choose the right machine and technique to treat.
I would doubt that anyone in UK has sufficient experience to treat DD properly - I personally went to Germany
and was well treated there ...

I don't think that it's rocket science for an competent consultant and UK equipment is more than adequate.

I actually asked why I was not given lead screening like the German example shown on this website

Cambidgeshire, UK.
I have heard second hand that Dr John Glees is very experienced in the use of therapeutic radiation and has significant knowledge of this treatment. Clearly its a patients own decision, but I would have no concerns using his services. If he had been treating DC with RT ten years ago when I went to Germany from the UK for treatment I would have gone to his clinic instead. The expertise is really in deciding what area of the hand to be radiated, i.e. deciding how far the DD has spread and adding a suitable margin. When I went to Germany, although I was assessed by a doctor, the RT itself was done by a technician.

07/12/2010 23:27
flojo 
07/12/2010 23:27
flojo 
Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

My RT was actually done by the technicians. The radiologist did the palpating, determined the extent of Dupuytren's in my hand and the mapping for the openings in the shield for exact area to be radiated. I saw the radiologist once at the end of the first week and at the end of the second week.

07/13/2010 20:35
TrevB 
07/13/2010 20:35
TrevB 

Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

flojo:
My RT was actually done by the technicians. The radiologist did the palpating, determined the extent of Dupuytren's in my hand and the mapping for the openings in the shield for exact area to be radiated. I saw the radiologist once at the end of the first week and at the end of the second week.

Similar to me. I had a number of staff carrying out my RT during the 10 days and I had complete confidence in them. I saw a consultant once to say that he'd go ahead and once for a short planning consultation. Saw a junior of the team after another few weeks, had a six monthly cancelled (although I doubt that I'd have travelled for similar) and that's been it

Cambidgeshire, UK.

12/10/2012 07:41
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

12/10/2012 07:41
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

Parkside, now operating as The Cancer Centre in London have published brief results of their experience so far treating patients with DD using Radiotherapy. See http://www.cancercentrelondon.co.uk/news...for-dupuytrens/

12/10/2012 14:00
potter 
12/10/2012 14:00
potter 
Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

Hi All,

Most interesting...
URL on the site is correct but gets delivered in e-mail with the [/url] at the end of the link - IE9 throws a tantrum about that last [/url] but can't speak for other browsers

One odd note re the Wimbledon posting.... odd to me anyway.... They state:

Only 4% of patients treated reported that their disease had progressed, which is the normal course of this progressive disease without treatment.

Now is it me or are they saying that 4% progress after RT... which is the same number as would have progressed anyway? And if so, then why bother?!

Enlighten me please!

Thanks,

Potter

Edited 12/10/12 16:08

12/10/2012 14:29
callie 
12/10/2012 14:29
callie 
Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

I noticed the same interesting statement. It does need clarification. Also, I didn't know that they radiated for Peyronie's disease as they suggested.

12/10/2012 14:29
Vikingorigins 
12/10/2012 14:29
Vikingorigins 

Re: Radiotherapy at Parkside Hospital, London

"Only 4% of patients treated reported that their disease had progressed, which is the normal course of this progressive disease without treatment."

Could this sentence be rather read as : the normal course of disease without treatment is progression. With RT it brings it down to 4%. ?

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