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What happens in the latter stages of DD
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01/22/2014 17:50
GeneralTHC 
01/22/2014 17:50
GeneralTHC 
Re: What happens in the latter stages of DD

I have what looks to me to be about an inch long cord in my palm over the tendon that affects my ring finger of my right hand. I can straighten my finger, though. There hasn't been really much of contraction, a little bit of one. It just feels a bit stiff at the max range.

From what I read about DD it sounds just like it. It started with a little nodule and formed into what it is now in just a couple years. It's been the same way for at least 5 years. I wondering if it isn't a bow stringing tendon, though. I've read that one is often misdiagnosed for the other in that location.

I'll try to get a pic up and see what you all think.

01/27/2014 03:46
Rdevin 
01/27/2014 03:46
Rdevin 
Re: What happens in the latter stages of DD

Lots of interesting comments on this thread.

I have since my original post and early comments been in contact with surgeons and although diagnosis over the internet is a struggle I have managed some replies and it seems the recommended approach is to have it sorted sooner than later.

Either by NA or surgery - or even lopping the whole thing off - there are still some unanswered and uncertain items.

Does the contracture keep on going, some people on the site say theirs stopped at a certain angle and never went further!
Is this a temporary thing and will it continue to contract next week or next year?

The comments about splints and stopping it by extra flexing the contraction are interesting as in my case I tried for years to stretch the affected finger but now I think it actually made it worse and grow faster - or bend faster.

Looking through the places to visit to get a fix it seems there are maybe some Australian clinics but everyone is hot on the French clinics. Tough choice so if anyone has some recomendations here it would be a great help. Paris would be a big cost though as the missus would be sure to max out the credit card - probably deserves it!

So when is the last point in the contracture you can get NA - at 130 or 140 degrees? What if it is on the palm - can the surgeons still operate or is that a lop it off case?

Best

Ramos

01/27/2014 08:03
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

01/27/2014 08:03
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: What happens in the latter stages of DD

You really need to have this discussion face to face with an experienced hand surgeon, and preferably one who also treats with NA and Xiaflex, so all options can be discussed as they pertain to your specific condition.

You have the message from here, the longer you leave a contracture, the harder it is going to be to restore function.

I don't think we can say what will happen. It may stop contracting, but maybe not. A contracture into the palm causes other problems with fungal and bacterial skin infections, as well as the other joint and tendon changes mentioned especially over time, and it's just a physical problem for a surgeon to get access to.

Everyone is different but NA and Xiaflex are effective in treating lesser contracture, so I would be inclined to use those treatments early or at appropriate times, but remember recurrence is always possible, even likely. Some people just don't bother, but since each of us are different we have differing expectations and uses of our hands.

01/27/2014 12:34
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

01/27/2014 12:34
spanishbuddha 

Administrator

Re: What happens in the latter stages of DD

GeneralTHC:
I have what looks to me to be about an inch long cord in my palm over the tendon that affects my ring finger of my right hand. I can straighten my finger, though. There hasn't been really much of contraction, a little bit of one. It just feels a bit stiff at the max range.

From what I read about DD it sounds just like it. It started with a little nodule and formed into what it is now in just a couple years. It's been the same way for at least 5 years. I wondering if it isn't a bow stringing tendon, though. I've read that one is often misdiagnosed for the other in that location.

I'll try to get a pic up and see what you all think.
A bowstring tendon is going to be more prominent when slightly closing the fingers and hand. A cord is hard, a tendon is not except under tension.

Edited 01/27/14 14:34

01/27/2014 15:03
callie 
01/27/2014 15:03
callie 
Re: What happens in the latter stages of DD

My suggestion is give NA a try. If that doesn't give good results (or the contracture is too advanced) then have surgery done by a very experienced HAND surgeon. I had excellent results with surgery and had very little pain during the surgery and recovery. I suggest that the sooner, the better.

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