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An Unappreciated Hands-on Experience
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05/31/2003 23:35
Larry W. Bryant

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05/31/2003 23:35
Larry W. Bryant

not registered

An Unappreciated Hands-on Experience

If trauma to the palms of one's hands triggers the onset of Dupuytren's, as many of us suspect, then perhaps we should be trying to catalog the particular types of trauma so as to warn potential DC victims of the need for risk avoidance.

In my own case, my catalog dates back to the fifties, mainly to my freshman days in college, where during gym class, I took part in a hand-ball course. In those days, few students had access to the special handball gloves meant to minimize the ball's impact to the palms. I now grimly recall how the pain of that impact limited my interest in, and prowess with, the sport.

Now, nearly 50 years later, I wonder how many young people are being introduced unwittingly to the legacy of Dr. Dupuytren via the handball court. Shouldn't we demand a little preventive medicine from the powers that be?

Specifically, I recommend that handball coaches be required to notify all their charges of Northern European descent that they scrupulously should avoid playing handball!

05/31/2003 23:45
Sean 
05/31/2003 23:45
Sean 
DC and baseball.

Larry,
I had the same experience in college. I took two years of handball in P.E. because the baseball coach wanted us (who were on the team) to play handball to help our baseball skills. A great sport, but as you say, it was tough on the hands. My hands were swelled after each class at first until they got "in condition". I played baseball from age 5 until after college(still have my A2000 glove). It certainly is reasonable that there is a connection. I am still in contact with many of the childhood friends, however, and I am the only one with DC. There is a slightly higher percentage for workers that use their hands in work that develope DC, but not what you would expect. It is a question that still hasn't been answered. DC just is unpredictable.

06/01/2003 23:44
Brian

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06/01/2003 23:44
Brian

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Screw driver Triggered mine

I accept that palmar/plantar inflamation is the underlying
process. About 5 years ago I used a heavily knurled
screw diver to the point of pain in my right hand.
I switched to my left; but stopped as soon as that
began hurting. Small nodules appeared within a few days.
Two years ago my Internist said, "Dupuytrens." One
year ago my right "pinkie" would no longer straighten
100%. I have no pain, no limitations, yet.
Yes, I played handball 30 years ago. Yes, I played
bare-handed and also with gloves. (I liked squash better.)
Genetics is the underlying process, in my opinion;
trauma may induce the local lesion that is recognized
as a limitation. Early onset is unusual (or under reported.)
Typical onset is in "middle-aged" period (50-60 years.)
I think that general public education is a desirable thing.
Perhaps a Dupuytren's Foundation is in order. Statistics seem limited as to numbers and demographics. That might be
a starting point. Numbers and Dollars get attention.

06/01/2003 23:40
Jim

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06/01/2003 23:40
Jim

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Tense Driving Triggered Mine

I concur! I bought a second car 4 years ago that pulled to the right. I went on a 400 mile trip and fought the wheel there and back. Two nodules appeared on my left hand palm under my ring and middle fingers. To this day, those have never changed in size or appearance but a year later, I developed a knot at the base of the pinkie which got the NA two months ago. I was always concerned about my dominate right hand which remained Dup free. Last November I rented a small car and drove to Kentucky in a bad wind storm. I fought that car throughout the trip. Within days I developed a larger than before knot this time on my right hand. As before, this hasn't changed but will probably be another replay of my left hand. I think we have a propensity for this disease, so I think this was aggrevated and triggered (effect) rather than a (cause).
But now I ALWAYS wear gloves when I drive. JIM

07/04/2005 23:00
John

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07/04/2005 23:00
John

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handball may have affected my hand also.

Hi,

I also have played handball prior to developing Duputryens and have had many bruises and injuries during that time.

Seems possible that there may be a link, in addition to genetic and environmental factors.

John.

07/04/2005 23:51
Patty

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07/04/2005 23:51
Patty

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trama

Mine was brought on by trigger finger on my middle finger in the left hand.Right after that surgery, I developed a cord in my palm. A freind of mine has it from playing golf, in both hands. If you are predestined to it, any trama or overuse of the hands can bring it on.
Patty

07/05/2005 23:28
JERRY 
07/05/2005 23:28
JERRY 
Trauma

I guess no one here has read about the FLARES issue?

Please visit; http://www.wstagner.com

Click LINKS, and scroll to FLARES; then on to other excellent information.

07/05/2005 23:07
Patty

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07/05/2005 23:07
Patty

not registered

Flares

Thanks Jerry, Makes alot of sence reading about Flares. I have always believed that the trauma of the trigger finger surgery brought the DD out.
Patty

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predestined   Specifically   Unappreciated   environmental   scrupulously   inflamation   underlying   unpredictable   unwittingly   baseball   information   demographics   Dupuytren   developed   Triggered   handball   middle-aged   bare-handed   Experience   limitations