| Lost password
112 users onlineYou are not loggend in.  Login
Liver Health
 1
 1
08/28/03 02:10
Mark C

not registered

08/28/03 02:10
Mark C

not registered

Liver Health

I have read that alcohol can cause 2 liver enzymes to be out of balance. If one does drink a lot, how do you know if Dupuytren's was from drinking, or if this Disease would have occurred in time anyway? And does a non-drinker have this same unbalance cause from genetics? How bad is the liver and the start of this disease? Is it time to dump all the beer? Anybody have more information after taking a blood test or any information from a doctor? I think one of the enzymes is collegian or something sounding likes it.

08/28/03 02:29
Mark C

not registered

08/28/03 02:29
Mark C

not registered

an added question

Can the Liver be nursed back to health, and if so, will DC dissapear?

08/30/03 02:02
Friend of a friend of Bill W.

not registered

08/30/03 02:02
Friend of a friend of Bill W.

not registered

Alcohol metabolism

I do not have an "expert" opinion; however, I do drink wine
and do have Dupuytren's. One hand surgeon I saw doubted any connection and said that he believed studies inolved populations that included alcoholics in disproportionate
numbers and that the association was tenuous at best. If
one goes to an alcohol recovery website, DC is listed as one of the consequences of alcohol usage. I believe that
the association is based on metabolic pathways of Ethanol
breaaking down to acetaldehyde which is injurious to lver function. Presumeably, circulating " irritants" simulate
repair and that triggers the D.C. response in genetically
vulnerable individuals. My personal (naive) opinion is that
covariability is likely; i.e., the same poulation that is genetically vulnerable to D.C. is also somewhat vulnerable to diabetes, alcoholism, epilepsy, etc. Persons with undiagnosed D.C. may be unreported about co-morbidity. They
think they have "arthritis" or "calluses." They are not
diagnosed and are missing from the "data pool." Meanwhile,
the V.A. and Kaiser are collecting data that relects their
case load. Take France; how many people abstain from alcohol
there? Most Frenchmen with D.C. also consumes un bon vin.
Again, this is just opinion and/or denial on my part. I am more concerned about trauma than I am about claret. Check out an AA website on deleterious effects of alcohol and make an informed, responsible decision. If it worries you,
stop drinking. If that is difficult, seek asistance.
Keep learning about new understandings and treatments on this web-site and others. We all benefit from the dialogue.

09/12/03 02:56
Ken

not registered

09/12/03 02:56
Ken

not registered

Duputrens & Alcohol

My father was a fairly heavy drinker (Irish - what can I say?) and had Dupuytrens.
I, on the other hand, do not drink alcohol, smoke, or use cafeine and yet my case is much worse than my father's was.

I believe that, in earlier times, the people who did hard labour presented the greatest number of cases of Dupuytrens. Labourers, so the thinking of the time was, tended to be heavy alcohol drinkers. And so, with this type of reasoning... over indulgence in alcohol was the cause of Dupuytrens.

The number of people I know who do not now - and never have - used alcohol ... and who have Dupeytrens blows that theory out of the water.

09/15/03 02:11
warner

not registered

09/15/03 02:11
warner

not registered

Liver and Dup

I have been told, by internist not surgeon, that certain liver problems (some liver enzyme function, I know not what) have a corelation with with Dupuytrens. This means that if you have this paticular liver problem you are more likely to have Dupuytrens, it does not mean that it causes Dupuytrens. Similar corelations exist with Diabetes, Thyroid, and seizures (epilepsy).

Alcohol can cause this paticular liver function problem, but does not have to. I have dupuytrens (bad), I was a heavy drinker, I don't have this paticular liver problem. I have also been tested for all other known corelations and they can't find them. I am one of the 70% or so in whom the problem is ideopathic (Greek for we don't have a clue).

My surgeon (and I have had very good luck with surgery, but the problem keeps occruing elsewhere in the hand, usually at the edge of a previous surgical site), is of the firm opinon that shock can trigger a rapid expansion of an existing growth. In my case I broke the 3rd and 4th metacarpals of one hand, and when he was examining the hand prior to setting the bones (which required sugery), noted nodules in the palm at the base of the ring finger. He told me, correctly, that I could expect a contracuture there in 6 to 12 months. That was Feb. he operated for Duuytrens in November.

07/13/06 02:00
Ann Stalls

not registered

07/13/06 02:00
Ann Stalls

not registered

After Surgery

Well, I am a woman in the United States that has this disease. I had surgery in three areas, the palm, the pinky and the middle finger. I have a mountain of a scar in my palm and these thick scars on my fingers. I have been on Vicondin since the surgery. I don't think I am better off as of yet. I am suffering and my hand will not open. I exercise and massage the areas with Vit E. I am wondering if anyone else has had these problems after surgery. I had my surgery on May 30th and now it is July12th. I thought I would be Ok by now but I am not. I am very depressed because it could come back. Any hope?
Ann

07/14/06 02:40
jim h

not registered

07/14/06 02:40
jim h

not registered

Jim

Don't expect much after just 2 months. It takes the better part of a year for things to return to normal. Just keep doing the PT and it will be fine eventually. I've had 2 surgeries, the first was almost 8 years ago and have had no recurrence in the areas of the surgery, although I now have problems in other locations.

07/16/06 02:34
Randy H.

not registered

07/16/06 02:34
Randy H.

not registered

The odds are with you Ann.

Ann,

From personal experience I can tell you that everyone responds differently to Open Hand Surgery. Some have the bravado to say it's a "snap", but if that were *really* the case this website would not exist. The whole idea behind our host's product (Collagenase) is to *avoid* Open Surgery of the hand. If OS wasn't quite difficult for quite a few people we would not be having this discussion.

Our host's research shows that there is *tremendous* demand among both patients and doctors for an alternative noninvasive approach. And now you yourself know exactly why.

jim is absolutely correct that you need to do everything your PT asked of you. Unfortunately you and I have been dealt a "bad hand" when it comes to scaring. That's just the way it is. However, most people recover well within 6 to 12 months. The odds are with you. You had your hand opened up quite a bit. The deeper invasion, the harder the recovery. You are not a Baby. This is reality. You are the reason why so many of us are so passionate about NA and Collagenase. Avoid further OS.

God Speed

07/17/06 02:43
Ann Stalls

not registered

07/17/06 02:43
Ann Stalls

not registered

Collagenase???

What is Collagenase? Where do you get it?
I made a milestone yesterday. My pinky can reach the A key. I am happy for any impovement.
Ann

07/17/06 02:03
Wolfgang

not registered

07/17/06 02:03
Wolfgang

not registered

Collagenase

Ann, just a short comment: collagenase is an enzyme that is meant to dissolve to some extent scar tissue or Dupuytren cords. Collagenase treatment of Dupuytren is not generally approved by FDA yet. The drug has been developed by Biospecifics, the company that hosts this forum. Now, to my knowledge, Auxilium is in charge of collagenase.

If you want to learn more about collagenase you might google Dupuytren and collagenase. You can also read various threads on this forum or look at www.dupuytren-online.info under "Other therapies".

Wolfgang

Wolfgang

 1
 1
Biospecifics   disproportionate   understandings   association   corelations   consequences   surgery   contracuture   genetically   Dupuytrens   acetaldehyde   vulnerable   Unfortunately   alcohol   co-morbidity   dupuytren-online   covariability   information   Collagenase   Dupuytren