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Michigan Dupuytrens Suffers
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03/31/2003 23:23
Len Buchanan

not registered

03/31/2003 23:23
Len Buchanan

not registered

Michigan Dupuytrens Suffers

Is there anyone out there from the Michigan area? I currently live in West Michigan, have a doctor who I have seen and diagnosed my case 3-4 years ago. I am looking a the Montreal Dr for NA. Any othere sufferers out there in Michigan and how are your doctors?

05/11/2003 23:07
joanne

not registered

05/11/2003 23:07
joanne

not registered

Dr in MI

I havd had DC for 13 years and have had surgery about 7 times with Dr Markley in Ann Arbor. I sent my photo to France for NA but was turned down because of previous surgeries. I would certainly try NA before surgery.

08/10/2005 23:51
clif

not registered

08/10/2005 23:51
clif

not registered

recent surgery

typing one handed.surgery muskegon 1 wk ago. see doc mon aug 15.

clif

08/15/2005 23:22
Clif

not registered

08/15/2005 23:22
Clif

not registered

10 days after surgery

Having had a dozen surgeries for conditions from cancer to cataracts and everything in between, I know that every case is different and the "healing arts" are not exact science, but highly educated and controversial guesswork. So my experience with Dupes may or may not be typical or predictive of what others can expect. I just had a major fasciectomy of the right pinkie by a plastic surgeon who does many hand surgeries. There was lots of scar tissue from surgery ten years ago. The other hand is also now seriouly affected.I admit to letting it go too long before this surgery. I have a lot of pain and such a small correction of the contracture that I am now seriously considering amputation of both pinkies.Even if NA were financially viable, I'm sure the scar tissue on the right hand would have disqualified me.
I'm frankly astounded by the posters who speak casually of flying off to Florida, France or Australia for surgery. If I had that kind of money I wouldn't be shoveling Michigan snow every year.

Clif in Michigan

08/15/2005 23:30
Sean 
08/15/2005 23:30
Sean 
Contracture

Clif,
How can you tell in two weeks, the outcome of your surgery? My finger was about 85 degrees contraction before surgery (fasciectomy). It was still curved somewhat immediately after surgery. The therapy/splints following surgery are important. My finger now 3 1/2 years later is 0 degrees contracture and showing no signs of Dupuytren's

08/16/2005 23:05
Clif

not registered

08/16/2005 23:05
Clif

not registered

Thanks, Sean

You are right, Sean. I need to dust off all those positive thinking books and quit borrowing trouble so soon after surgery. I'm old and cranky about second time surgeries, one of which almost croaked me.
My plastic surgeon never heard of NA. I wonder how typical that is. When I told him what little I know of it from this group, he dismissed it as having little value. I'm going to copy a bunch of stuff, including some of the glowing testimonials and your post about the traditional job Eaton did for you, and see what the local doc has to say if he reads it. I hope some members will comment on the following questions I have , from being on several support/information groups:
Is it likely that regular readers of groups like this one know more about their condition or infirmity and treatments for it than their practioner does? Seems unlikely that doctors go home at night and read patient groups. And is it possible to know "too much" about what ails you and about all the traditional and alternative, legitimate and quack treatments? I get that feeling a lot from the posts on a cancer group I'm on . (I'm a "caught it early" survivor, doing remarkably well after almost ten years.) Any comments from those who are in other groups? I'm thinking about writing an article and would appreciate your input.

Clif in Michigan

08/16/2005 23:56
Randy H.

not registered

08/16/2005 23:56
Randy H.

not registered

Luck of the Irish

"Is it likely that <we> know more about <our> condition or infirmity and treatments for it than their practitioner does?"

Clif:

When it comes to Dups... I strongly doubt it. I firmly believe CHS know their stuff, their biology, and their profession quite well. While not brain surgery, you don't become a "Certified" Hand Specials for nothing. However, with such a rarefied and tightly knit specialty, I believe as a group they are self contained and insulated, making it difficult for them to believe that something revolutionary could come from outside, that they didn't dream up themselves. While understandable, this a problem for those who want to see NA become more widely available.

Some years ago a far more significant controversy arose regarding treating cancer with Laetrile. Lucky for cancer patients the medical establishment was *very* cautious until basic clinical trials showed that further research was as useless as the medication. The Laetrile movement died because it didn't work, not because there weren't enough desperate people who wanted to try it. In the same way, I can understand how a CHS might equate NA with a treatment like Laetrile and simply glaze over at it's mention.

However, there happens to be a *major* difference here. NA actually *works* as advertised and will hold up to scrutiny if and when it gets it's full day in court. That being the case, it's eventual acceptance is likely, especially so when a respected "insider" and member of the "CHS Club" is going to do his best to see that it does.

No, CHS know what they're doing. They just have a natural blind spot that should eventually get fixed. Fascinating to me how this *single* web site has been the most significant agent of change to that end. Without it......no NA outside of Europe. We got extremely lucky.

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