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Ganglion/Dupuytren
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08/29/2008 06:40
Katie 
08/29/2008 06:40
Katie 
Ganglion/Dupuytren

I just had surgery yesterday for a supposed Ganglion but it turned out to be Dupuytren instead. The nodule and cord were located in my right palm below my middle finger. My hand is heavily bandaged and I have around 6 sutures whcih will be removed in 2 weeks time. Can anyone advise me what recovery period to expect?

08/29/2008 07:03
Wolfgang

not registered

08/29/2008 07:03
Wolfgang

not registered

Re: Ganglion/Dupuytren

Hi Katie, first of all, don't worry: you will recover and that's most important. The recovery period depends very much on the individual condition. You might be OK in 6 weeks, though you will still have scars and better would not over-exercise your hand. It might take longe in case your hand swells and that swelling can take a while to go go away. After my Dupuytren surgery it took me about 3 months until I could make a fist and about 6 months until the swelling was completely gone. But I don't think that's typical. Usually recovery is faster. Once your wounds have healed it makes sense to exercise your hand regularly, maybe bath it in warm water several times a day and use a skin cream on the scars.

Wishing you a specially quick recovery

Wolfgang

08/29/2008 10:58
Katie 
08/29/2008 10:58
Katie 
Re: Ganglion/Dupuytren

Thankyou Wolfgang for your helpful response and kind wishes. I wonder if this is a common mistake with diagnosing a ganglion as opposed to DC. The Dr who performed the surgery has worked with the well known Doctor in Germany (forgot his name). So I was bit surprised his diagnosis was incorrect, although he did not see the ultrasound report done by another Doctor who also said it was not Dupuytren C.

08/29/2008 11:48
Wolfgang

not registered

08/29/2008 11:48
Wolfgang

not registered

Re: Ganglion/Dupuytren

A ganglion looks and feels similar to a initial Dupuytren nodule (see http://www.dupuytren-online.info/dupuytr..._therapies.html) and the true character is sometimes only exhibited after the tissue is analyzed. Specifically if one doctor already excluded that you have Dupuytren's then the assumption that you have a ganglion is not far fetched. I think you can't blame your doctor, it was just unfortunate.

Wolfgang

08/29/2008 12:25
Katie 
08/29/2008 12:25
Katie 
Re: Ganglion/Dupuytren

That certainly helps explain things. I am sorry if I gave the impression of placing blame onto the doctors involved, it was certainly not my intention. I have a great deal of respect for the Dr. who performed my surgery as he has been extremely accommodating to my requests including scheduling my surgery at short notice before leaving Sweden to return to Australia.

08/30/2008 06:28
pixi 
08/30/2008 06:28
pixi 
Re: Ganglion/Dupuytren

Welcome, Katie. I too had my knuckle pad initially diagnosed as a ganglion by three separate doctors including a rheumatologist. It's amazing how misunderstood this condition is.

08/30/2008 08:01
newman 
08/30/2008 08:01
newman 

Re: Ganglion/Dupuytren

Hi Katie Australia Calling,
Could I pass on the advice I was given back at my first surgery many moons ago. Firstly it is very important to keep your hand elevated after surgery. ie above the heart line ,which will help in reducing the swelling and any build up of fluid .Rest your hand on your shoulder, when you are siting down and relaxing. Move your fingers as much and as often as is comfortable (like playing the piano) this helps pump the blood back ,through the viens. Dont get the wound wet until the doctor removes the dressing.
Once the dressing is removed then bathe your hand in warm water, trying to gently stretch and form a fist. Be careful in the early stages . Dry the wound with your hair dryer and apply just a smear of Vitemin E creme along the scar line. In my last few ops they applied the Elastoplast wrap or hydrofix straight over the area, which alows the air in and helps with healing process. In my case ,I believe exercise as you move along the healing process is very important. Once the stitches are out or they have disolved ,thats the time to increase the exercise, as I have found ,that the movement gained in the first four weeks ,in some cases is all you will have. However this may not apply to you as I did not read how much contraction you had prior to surgery. Regards

Edited at 08/30/08 12:17

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