| Lost password
60 users onlineYou are not loggend in.  Login
NA Question
 1
 1
07/23/2014 04:46
pia2some 
07/23/2014 04:46
pia2some 
NA Question

Hi everyone,

I had a question about NA. I know that they cut the cords that are in the palm of the hand. What I am wondering is about the fingers. Are they able to cut cords that are up in the fingers. My pinky is at about a 60 degree contracture with a cord that runs from the palm up to the PIP joint. Do they do anything up into the finger? Just wondering.

Thanks!

~ dawn

07/23/2014 05:33
Seph 
07/23/2014 05:33
Seph 

Re: NA Question

Dawn; In my experience NA is more about the cutting the cords in the fingers than the cords through the palm of the hand so yes they do.

Don't leave your finger too long. I left the little finger in my right hand too long and the knuckle fused. Each time I get NA done now the doctor gets about 10 degrees improvement but it doesn't last long. My other fingers though have been great. I have have multiple fingers done on each hand.

07/23/2014 13:03
pia2some 
07/23/2014 13:03
pia2some 
Re: NA Question

Seph:
Dawn; In my experience NA is more about the cutting the cords in the fingers than the cords through the palm of the hand so yes they do.

Don't leave your finger too long. I left the little finger in my right hand too long and the knuckle fused. Each time I get NA done now the doctor gets about 10 degrees improvement but it doesn't last long. My other fingers though have been great. I have have multiple fingers done on each hand.

I have an appointment for NA on my left hand for August 7. I had a partial fasciectomy on my right hand last fall that turned into a disaster. I have little use of my right hand now. It will now require a dermofasciectomy, which I'm nowhere ready to take on.

Since my right hand has so little function, I need my left hand to be in somewhat good shape. Right now it has significant contractures in the pinky, ring, index and thumb. The doctor is going to work on it and try to get some of it released. I'm cautiously hopeful since everything we've done up until now has not worked and resulted in worsening the disease.

With your pinky, did they make the punctures all the way up the finger? Or do they mostly work on it from the palm and the base of the fingers? Also, this surgeon puts his NA patients in a plaster cast for 48 hours. I have never heard of anyone doing this.

~ dawn

07/23/2014 21:14
Seph 
07/23/2014 21:14
Seph 

Re: NA Question

Dawn; The plaster cast sounds weird. Are you sure the doctor has a lot of experience with NA.

I have had NA done 5 times by two different doctors in Paris. I go to Paris because the doctors their have a lot of experience. It is also cheap (2-300 euros per hand). So I get a trip to Paris on the money I save.

With both doctors the procedure has been the same. They work by sight and feel making cuts along the full length of the cord. New needle for each puncture, entry to the depth of the cord, inject very local anesthetic wait 30 seconds for the anesthetic to take effect then start cutting. Take needle out, take a new needle move along the cord and do it again. After 4-5 cuts the doctor takes the finger and pulls it hard. With luck there is a loud snap (sometimes heard by my wife in the room next door) and voila the finger is straight.

Each time the doctors have moved along the cord wherever it goes. Not restricting to any part of the hand.

After each procedure my hand has been bandages and I have been told to keep the bandages on with the hand clean and dry for 3 days. On one occasion I was given a splint but otherwise nothing extra. Never talk of a cast?

07/24/2014 01:41
pia2some 
07/24/2014 01:41
pia2some 
Re: NA Question

Seph:
Dawn; The plaster cast sounds weird. Are you sure the doctor has a lot of experience with NA.

I have had NA done 5 times by two different doctors in Paris. I go to Paris because the doctors their have a lot of experience. It is also cheap (2-300 euros per hand). So I get a trip to Paris on the money I save.

With both doctors the procedure has been the same. They work by sight and feel making cuts along the full length of the cord. New needle for each puncture, entry to the depth of the cord, inject very local anesthetic wait 30 seconds for the anesthetic to take effect then start cutting. Take needle out, take a new needle move along the cord and do it again. After 4-5 cuts the doctor takes the finger and pulls it hard. With luck there is a loud snap (sometimes heard by my wife in the room next door) and voila the finger is straight.

Each time the doctors have moved along the cord wherever it goes. Not restricting to any part of the hand.

After each procedure my hand has been bandages and I have been told to keep the bandages on with the hand clean and dry for 3 days. On one occasion I was given a splint but otherwise nothing extra. Never talk of a cast?

Thanks, Seph! Yes, this surgeon has actually done hundreds of NA procedure. He wasn't trained by Dr. Eaton but by another doctor who was trained by Eaton. My surgeon attends various conferences on DC and stays quite up-to-date on everything. He's considered one of the best Dupuytren's doctors in the area and has a lot of interest in the disease.

He has performed NA several times over the years on my mother's hands and each one was very successful. Her description of the procedure sounds just like yours. He puts a cast on her hand afterwards and it stays on that day and the day after that. Then on the third day, mom goes to the physical therapist who removes the cast and fits her for a night splint. She also gives her some exercises to do at home for a few weeks.

I didn't have to schedule a regular office visit with the surgeon prior to having the NA. Since I've seen him a lot this past year (following my hand surgery), we'd talked a lot about NA. He told me just to call and schedule when I was ready. That's why I've not been able to ask him detailed questions such as why he uses a cast. I won't see him until the day of the NA procedure. Guess I can ask then. lol

~ dawn

 1
 1
contractures   fingers   bandages   doctors   surgeon   everything   otherwise   significant   Question   experience   contracture   improvement   dermofasciectomy   conferences   description   appointment   fasciectomy   procedure   anesthetic   restricting