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Correct yourself dupuytren contracture
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 1
09/15/13 23:04
tomceunen 
09/15/13 23:04
tomceunen 
Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

On the age of 32 I got the first sign of dupuytren contracture on my ring finger in the hand palm. Today after 12 years the finger is about 5 degrees out of sync.
Well I tripped today on the wooden stairs in my house today. Falling forward I stretched my arm out and my fingers hit the stair edge. Result was an over extension of fingers in respect to the hand palm. Moreover I felt two clicks in my hand palm. The clicks came with an intense acute pain. I looked at my hand I noticed my finger was back straight and I spotted two tiny spaces on the dupuytren contracture that were more dark than the rest of the skin. This is were I broke twice myself the palmar fascia. After 10s no pain anymore and looks like I cured myself for the time being.

So just wondering if this can be done easily by myself then I assume other were first and this is a way to cure one self?


Cheers :)
Tom

07/13/15 11:38
newman 
07/13/15 11:38
newman 

Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

Hi Tom,you might consider wearing a night splint. Luck and youth were on your side that you did not break or dislocate anything.

Edited 07/13/15 12:03

07/18/15 05:31
tomceunen 
07/18/15 05:31
tomceunen 
Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

So 2y later the dupuytren contracture is still growing. The cut in the dupuytren contracture I made falling corrected my finger to normal and delayed the dupuytren contracture. Today my finger has again a very slight 1 or 2 degree error. This is my right hand.
On my left hand I noticed last week I have the very early stage of dupuytren contracture also in the palm on the ring finger line. The dupuytren contracture feels like a ball 3mm wide.
On the same left hand since 5y a dupuytren contracture has been growing on my pink and I believe that will need surgery within a year.
I have no plans falling of the stairs currently

06/15/18 17:08
Deodand 
06/15/18 17:08
Deodand 
Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

Some days, I'd throw myself down some stairs if I though it would make my hands quit hurting! :)

06/15/18 20:51
tomceunen 
06/15/18 20:51
tomceunen 
Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

Although the contraction grew, after 3y my ring finger is still straight. So the unintentional fall was a good thing.
The contraction is very slightly curving my hand, bringer my pink closer to my thumb, but keeps my fingers straight.
I do sleep with a self made glove with splint.
I guess I can wait another three years before it needs action as I can still put my hand flat on the table.

09/10/20 11:53
Robertmiller1 
09/10/20 11:53
Robertmiller1 
Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

Hi,
Dupuytren’s disease is a condition that causes the fingers to be pulled inwards towards the palm. As the condition progresses, the tendons in the palm of hand continue to thicken, as said by Web MD Depending on the speed at which it progresses and the symptom of Dupuytren’s Contracture, a treatment method is decided.

Leaving Dupuytren’s Contracture untreated:

Having fingers bent sideways or living with a lump in the palm of the hand below the middle finger or ring finger may lead to a lot of difficulties in movement. Letting it go untreated may lead to problems.


Other Complications may Arise:

Other conditions are linked to Dupuytren’s Contracture and leaving it untreated may allow more problems to arise. A person suffering from Dupuytren’s Disease may develop Garrod’s pads, Ledderhose Disease, or Peyronie’s Disease, which may lead to multiple other problems related to the hands and feet.

May become Permanent:

Letting Dupuytren’s Contracture go untreated is very dangerous as the disease prolongs the fingers and will continue to bend and contract. The fingers will continue to become more flexed until they are not able to open or extended at all, as said by handsurgery.org

Loss of Function in Hand:

As stated above, letting Dupuytren’s Contracture go untreated causes the fingers to be permanently flexed and bent. This means that the patient will be unable to open their hand. The movement of the hand becomes seriously limited until eventually, the hand is entirely unusable and experiences a complete loss of function.

It is always important to speak with your physician before beginning any new treatment or physical therapy for Dupuytren’s Contracture.

09/10/20 19:07
wach 

Administrator

09/10/20 19:07
wach 

Administrator

Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

Just to avoid potential misunderstandings:

"Other conditions are linked to Dupuytren’s Contracture and leaving it untreated may allow more problems to arise. A person suffering from Dupuytren’s Disease may develop Garrod’s pads, Ledderhose Disease, or Peyronie’s Disease, which may lead to multiple other problems related to the hands and feet."

Patients suffering from Dupuytren's may develop Ledderhose disasease or Garrod's pads. This is irrespective of whether Dupuytren's is treated or not. Treatment for Dupuytren's can only treat symptoms. There is no cure.


Wolfgang

Edited 09/10/20 19:08

09/13/20 00:35
tomceunen 
09/13/20 00:35
tomceunen 
Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

Thanks for the (scary) advise.

so its 2020 and my situation is pretty stable not getting worse. I.e. almost all is straight. I do sleep with DIY gloves to keep the lower part of the fingers straight at night

Cheers
Tom

09/13/20 08:10
wach 

Administrator

09/13/20 08:10
wach 

Administrator

Re: Correct yourself dupuytren contracture

If your situation is stable. I wouldn't worry but continue enjoying life. The biggest danger with Dupuytren's is that you are getting too scared and concerned. Symptoms can be treated if required, so no need to worry.

Wolfgang

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