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Diet Nice and NAC
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06/17/11 18:07
Fred 
06/17/11 18:07
Fred 
Diet Nice and NAC

Hi,

Just wanted to report my progress with my diet following the interesting observations on the alternative therapy section of this site concerning Dupuytrens fibroblasts and glucose levels.

I have developed Dupuytrens on my right hand over the years - first noticed it about 10 years ago but thought it was just a callous due to the tennis racquet. Then became clear as the little finger bent that it was Dupuytrens. Had needle fasciotomy in Nice, France about 5 years ago (I live in Italy where the hand surgeons frown on anything other than the standard hand-opening operation). The operation in Nice was successful. It is a routine and low-cost procedure for the French. I was supposed to go back for a second operation to clear up some remaining nodules but never did. The Dupuytrens has now come back and also jumped to my left hand.

During this same ten year period I had increased my commitment to endurance sports - training and running full marathons etc. This often involved taking supplements, gels and sports drinks with glucose and fast-absorbed carbohydrates to maintain energy levels. I probably had excessive glucose in the blood because of this. My Depuytrens had increased in this same period. I was planning to go back to Nice this year but began reading about the old German research on a connection between tumors (including fibroblasts) and diet/insulin response and glucose levels and it struck a chord (excuse pun).

I began by eliminating all sports supplements and then by going on a low-carbohydrate low-glycemic- index diet ( similar to a Zone-diet I suppose ). I've been doing this for about five weeks now and am surprised by the results. I also introduced N.A.C a week ago. The nodules in the left hand have already begun to recede. On the index finger,, where they were small but progressing, the nodules have almost completely disappeared. The other ones on the left index finger have softened considerably and the larger ones on the right index finger have also softened and the finger is much more comfortable - not so rigid.

I still train (but not so intensely during this summer period) so the training also keeps glucose levels down, I think. Also on the thin/fat ratio mentioned in the studies, I was trim and fit before but have now lost a further 2 1/2 kilos, though this was not the intention. This may mean there are less fat pockets to absorb excess glucose but probably this is offset by the training and diet. Hoping this good news continues and that it may be a pointe rin the right direction for some.

06/18/11 09:40
wach 

Administrator

06/18/11 09:40
wach 

Administrator

Re: Diet Nice and NAC

Interesting observation, Fred! Please keep us informed as you are maintaining your diet. Even if you are not mainatining it, it might be inetersting to see whether Dupuytren's becomes more lively again.

Wishing you success

Wolfgang

12/18/12 01:21
cureall 
12/18/12 01:21
cureall 
Re: Diet Nice and NAC

It's been over a year since you reported your findings about diet. And yet you haven't given us an update. Please give us an update as to your progress. If what you subscribe to isn't working, we'd like to know. And vice versa.

thanks,
cureall

06/15/13 21:17
Fred 
06/15/13 21:17
Fred 
Re: Diet Nice and NAC

My previous post concerning diet referenced Otto Warburg's research on glucose build up in fibroblasts and how diet may effect this. I was not consistent in continuing that low/no sugar diet because of various training commitments and general temptations from Rome food and wine! But I am going to get back onto it this year to see if there is any long term effect on my Dupuytrens.

I have, however, noted the increasing interest for NAC supplementation on this site. I have been continuing with selective supplementation to maintain mitochondria energy conversion levels ; NAC is one of the supplements I regularly use (but this should be used, for example, with Vitamin C to increase and balance its effect - there are studies on the improved effect of this combination on the reduction of tumoral type growths. ) together with other substances such as COq10. The point being that the effect prof Warburg noted - a decrease in mitochondrial energy metabolism giving rise to an increase in glycolytic flux - is now routinely corrected also by supplements such as those used by athletes to increase mitochondria activity in order to accelerate creation of energy. Endurance training, itself, also increases mitochondria. (But I'm just a lawyer and 60 year old master athlete not a doctor - but have researched supplements extensively. As we get older it is useful to take supplements for sports because our mitochondria activity reduces as oxidisation sets in).

My dupuytrens has remained softer in the left hand but little finger of the right has begun to worsen slightly. Diet and targeted supplementation might have an effect.

Fred

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